Animal Heaven

What's your favorite biblical animal?


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Jan 19, 2013
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I have heard preaching that our pets won't be in heaven.

1: Animals do not have the same kind of soul as humans. (But God created and saw it was 'Good')
2: Our God knows the number of the hairs on our heads and the grains of sand in the sea.
3: Our God through Jesus Christ made the Garden perfect WITH animals.
4: The New Heaven and New Earth are going to be the Old Earth remade. (All of Creation 'resurrected' from death)
5: God 'saved' more animals on Noah's ark than he did people.
6: EVERYTHING is God's

Isaiah 11
6 The wolf also shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the kid; and the calf and the young lion and the fatling together; and a little child shall lead them.
7 And the cow and the bear shall feed; their young ones shall lie down together: and the lion shall eat straw like the ox.
8 And the sucking child shall play on the hole of the asp, and the weaned child shall put his hand on the cockatrice' den.
9 They shall not hurt nor destroy in all my holy mountain: for the earth shall be full of the knowledge of the Lord, as the waters cover the sea.

Isaiah 65
25 The wolf and the lamb shall feed together, and the lion shall eat straw like the bullock: and dust shall be the serpent's meat. They shall not hurt nor destroy in all my holy mountain, saith the Lord.

Where in the Bible does it say: "no pets in Heaven!"?

Maybe; we just don't believe how big a God we really have. If our God will raise our defective bodies from the dust of the old earth, why can't He raise our pets and animals at his pleasure to be on the new earth-for His adopted children? What is a cat or dog raised compared to the sun and moon set in orbit; or New Jerusalem with it's 1400 mile long walls descending from heaven to earth?

Oh the glorious mysteries of our God-wonder of wonders....
 

LanceA

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Mar 2, 2014
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I think it is all speculation and really doesn't matter. When we get to heaven we won't be worrying about these things since our focus will be on God. If it comforts you knowing your pet will be with you in heaven then I guess believe it.
 
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Apr 28, 2014
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UK
I believe all animals can talk,
but if they did all they would talk about is football because that requires no intelligence.
I'm not sure I agree there but I do believe animals can attempt to communicate with us vocally. Even our ferret seems to know she is "Willy Weasel"...

As for intelligence and animals, I don't know how to judge it properly but I think they are incredibly good at being what they are. To me, a cat knows its "catty ways" including knowing how to manipulate us humans. Perhaps one of the more surprising to me was a horse a young friend took me out to try to ride on. I'm pretty well convinced she knew full well she had an idiot on her back. She didn't try to do anything nasty like throw me but she seemed to make it clear I was not a real rider.

On to football, maybe it's an instinct but one thing that stuck in my mind from years ago was seeing Martin Peters (one of the England world cup squad in 1966) play for Norwich. What struck me was that he seemed to have a sort of second more time on the ball than anyone else on the pitch. While I can enjoy watching it , there are lots of things I could debate about football, including the importance we can put on kicking a bit of inflated leather about and the money involved in the game. That players have some form of instinct/talent/intelligence/ability I never had is not something I'd deny though.
 
Feb 5, 2013
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Wharton NJ
Do animals ever go to heaven? Like, when your pet dies do you ever see them when you pass on to the after life?:cry:
I don't know! one thing I know, we should not be obsessed or worried too much on whether out pets will make it to heaven or not.. We can be sure that the Lord is taking care of them as well.. As Jesus said, he is worried even about sparrows!
 
Jul 22, 2010
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Australia
I'm not sure I agree there but I do believe animals can attempt to communicate with us vocally. Even our ferret seems to know she is "Willy Weasel"...

As for intelligence and animals, I don't know how to judge it properly but I think they are incredibly good at being what they are. To me, a cat knows its "catty ways" including knowing how to manipulate us humans. Perhaps one of the more surprising to me was a horse a young friend took me out to try to ride on. I'm pretty well convinced she knew full well she had an idiot on her back. She didn't try to do anything nasty like throw me but she seemed to make it clear I was not a real rider.

On to football, maybe it's an instinct but one thing that stuck in my mind from years ago was seeing Martin Peters (one of the England world cup squad in 1966) play for Norwich. What struck me was that he seemed to have a sort of second more time on the ball than anyone else on the pitch. While I can enjoy watching it , there are lots of things I could debate about football, including the importance we can put on kicking a bit of inflated leather about and the money involved in the game. That players have some form of instinct/talent/intelligence/ability I never had is not something I'd deny though.
Now if you want to talk about paint drying that would hold my interest better.
 
Jul 22, 2010
3,157
1,225
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Australia
I'm not sure I agree there but I do believe animals can attempt to communicate with us vocally. Even our ferret seems to know she is "Willy Weasel"...

As for intelligence and animals, I don't know how to judge it properly but I think they are incredibly good at being what they are. To me, a cat knows its "catty ways" including knowing how to manipulate us humans. Perhaps one of the more surprising to me was a horse a young friend took me out to try to ride on. I'm pretty well convinced she knew full well she had an idiot on her back. She didn't try to do anything nasty like throw me but she seemed to make it clear I was not a real rider.

On to football, maybe it's an instinct but one thing that stuck in my mind from years ago was seeing Martin Peters (one of the England world cup squad in 1966) play for Norwich. What struck me was that he seemed to have a sort of second more time on the ball than anyone else on the pitch. While I can enjoy watching it , there are lots of things I could debate about football, including the importance we can put on kicking a bit of inflated leather about and the money involved in the game. That players have some form of instinct/talent/intelligence/ability I never had is not something I'd deny though.
Animals are quite intelligent. They don't do calculus because it bores them...like me with football, they'd rather watch paint dry.
I have two cats, one communicates with body language more than vocally, the other is quite vocal and has quite an extensive vocabulary. They also understand relatively complex instructions such as "Tell Mandy to come for her brushing" or "Tell Tim to come for his brushing" and they will go and fetch the other
 
Aug 19, 2014
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Australia
we have two dogs, small, timmy who as it happens is with me now on the floor behind me, actually benji is there too,
timmy is a sneaky one who likes to pee
in the kitchen and skulk away with a guilty look on his face,
but he is a bit smarter then benji,
benji the other dog knows how to use the doggy door to come in but refuses to use it to go out?
thankfully both of them when desperate only use the kitchen tiles,
I have walked in it. [I never wanted a dog but the wife did, so I lose]
 
Apr 28, 2014
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UK
Yep, I think I'd agree with you and Calvin that within the limits of their own catty, doggy etc. selves they are all different. I'd suggest they do have personalities. I've not had a cat that would understand an instruction as complex as Calvin's pair but the differences where one may be more vocal and another rely more on body language is something I have observed.

As for dogs, Meg seemed to have a born in instinct. She came from working farm stock but I believe was unwanted as she turned out brown and white rather than the more usual black and white for a border collie. If you played stick with her, she would want to run off and crouch down - if you've ever seen sheepdog trials, you'd know what I mean. She also liked to round things up, the chickens, even the wheelbarrow. She was a lovely dog but also the most head strong of the animals we've had. Sometimes, while I do believe we gave her a good home, I really did feel her true home would have been on the Welsh mountains. Even if I was fit and able now, I'd probably not take another sheepdog on for that reason.