In Memory Of Tozer

#1


A.W. Tozer was praised by several members recently, and I thought it would be a good idea to explore what the man really taught, and blow past sound-bytes about what folks thought he taught.

As a young man, he excepted dispensationalism, and then, upon deep investigation, he utter rejected it and campaigned until his demise against it's creeping influence.

An extract from an interview on his book "The Deeper Life", seen here http://www.sermonindex.net/modules/newbb/viewtopic.php?topic_id=33723&forum=35&2

Dr A. W. Tozer , outstanding spokesman of the Christian and Missionary Alliance, author of the Pursuit of God and other books, editor of the Alliance Weekly and pastor of the Southside C&MA Church in Chicago, answered questions for Christian Life regarding the future of evangelicalism.

Question...Dr Tozer, what significance do you attach to the growing discontent of evangelicals with the present spiritual depth of believers?

Tozer : I believe it is a healthy revolt against cold textual ism characteristic of evangelicalism for a quarter of a century or more. You see several converging forces met to determine the attitudes and temper of evangelicalism. The strong emphasis on dispensationalism, for instance, which started out to "rightly divide the word of truth," ended up by creating an army of cookie cutter believers, all repeating each other without any independent thought and without much need for the illumination of the Spirit.

The French naturalist, Faber, told of his starting a number or army worms around the rim of a jar. They followed each other blindly for days, each one dimly seeing the one ahead of him and following without question. After days of getting nowhere, they began one at a time to fall of the edge of the jar and perish. Evangelical leaders, like these army worms, have for decades been following each other around their own little jars, each one afraid to step aside or hunt any new direction for himself, each slavishly following the other. And so it happens that the emphasis has been away from the "deeper life,' the Spirit filled life, the life hid with Christ in God. The spiritual content of evangelicalism has been lowered. But, encouragingly, some people are growing discontented and are demanding bread instead of a stone. If there are enough of such people and if they speak out, it could mean healthy revival in the Church of Christ.
 
#2
From the A.W.Tozer Seminary website:

Vocationally A.W. Tozer served as pastor of Christian and Missionary Alliance churches in Chicago and Toronto. In 1950 he became the editor of the Alliance Witness. Tozer understood the power of words. He took pains to put his thoughts into edifying statements that would strengthen the Body of Christ and bring more glory to God. Tozer stands out because he avoided both the fundamentalism and the anti-intellectualism so common among Christians of the 20th century. Tozer's preaching was fresh. From his studies he drew heavily from Christian mystics, early church fathers, and revivalists. A.W. Tozer was particularly impressed by John Wesley's self-description of being "a man of One Book, but a student of many." Tozer preached the gospel so plainly that it has been said he was invited to speak everywhere—once. He refused to stand at the church door to shake hands with the congregation after church because in his mind that was "glad handing" people and setting himself up to be flattered and thus self-deceived. Biographer Lyle Dorsett put it this way: "Tozer concerned himself with the depth of his ministry, and left the breadth of his ministry up to the Holy Spirit."
http://tozer.simpsonu.edu/Pages/About/Tozer-AWTozer.htm
 
#4
I had to read one of his books for college. He was really good.
Yes he was...Unless you read him, it's best not to think he agrees with you, right? He was a maverick in the theological world in his day, but now folks think he is "mainstream"....but his concepts are really not, if one honestly seeks him out.
 
#6
Yes he was...Unless you read him, it's best not to think he agrees with you, right? He was a maverick in the theological world in his day, but now folks think he is "mainstream"....but his concepts are really not, if one honestly seeks him out.
I haven't really seeked him out. Maybe we didn't read him then, maybe we just learned about him? I just remember talking about him. Because if his things do not match up with the Word, my professors wouldn't have made us read him.

I'll definitely check out the video.
 
#8
I haven't really seeked him out. Maybe we didn't read him then, maybe we just learned about him? I just remember talking about him. Because if his things do not match up with the Word, my professors wouldn't have made us read him.

I'll definitely check out the video.
I've not really read a lot of him, either, though if he speacialized in doing hatchet jobs on dispensationalist writings, I probably won't give a lot of priority to his writings, either, although I'm sure he must have written some good things.
 
#9
No, Farouk: candid disproof is not a "hatchet job". Best thing to do is read him yourself and look at your beliefs of that theory with opened eyes.

The best way to know a man's writings, is to read them, right?
 
#10
No, Farouk: candid disproof is not a "hatchet job". Best thing to do is read him yourself and look at your beliefs of that theory with opened eyes.

The best way to know a man's writings, is to read them, right?
Oh I agree.

Tozer isn't the first, or the last, person to write about the subject, of course. (I've even been known to read the Bible myself for the past few decades, as have you yourself, also! :) )

Blessings.
 
#11
Oh I agree.

Tozer isn't the first, or the last, person to write about the subject, of course. (I've even been known to read the Bible myself for the past few decades, as have you yourself, also! :) )

Blessings.
So....read him and decide for yourself.

Like Spurgeon? He was hotly and openly against dispensationalism and many things Darby and Scofield promoted. And he knew Darby personally.

Best read him too on the subject. Might quote him on here sometime.