Mild concerns about new pastor

A couple years ago, our old pastor was removed from his position after he was found engaging in behavior he should not have been engaging in.

It took a couple years but our church has a new pastor now and I’m starting to have some concerns. He’s younger (I’m guessing late 20s or early 30s) and has some new ideas for the church such as embracing youth outreach and remodeling parts of the building to make it more modern and, as he puts it, “inviting.”

He is working on his doctorate in theology and frequently talks about it from the pulpit and how close he is to earning his degree. I’m concerned that he may be exhibiting signs of pride surrounding this accomplishment.

All this to say I’m concerned about spending church money on unnecessary renovations (the church looks like it was updated 10-15 years ago and doesn’t really need renovations), that he is embracing watered down sermons to appeal to the younger masses, and about the frequency with which he discusses his pursuit of his doctorate. But the biggest concern I have is this: is this an issue of me pointing out his splinter while I have a log in my eye? Am I just being an old grump resisting change? How can I know for sure?

As I write this, I’m realizing the issues I’m bringing up seem mild but it feels like a bigger deal to me for some reason. I’m not really sure how to describe it. Hypothetically, if this is the beginning of a slippery slope and things start getting drastically worse, would it be wise to approach the pastor and share my concerns or better to find a different church to attend? What does the scripture say about the method and appropriateness of confronting church leaders?
 
Hi there, Skipper. We had a situation here in Kentucky a few years back. A young pastor, right out of a seminary, came in promoting himself and his big ideas. After getting a bunch of complaints for a few weeks, the Board of Directors told the new pastor to read Paul's words in 1 Timothy 3:1-7 and to appear back in front of the Board when he was done reading. He got out his bible and it took less than 15 minutes, and when he came back, he had a letter with him promising to do better. He did, and is still the lead pastor at the church. Them words in 1 Timothy 3:1-7 (NLT) from Paul are here:

"3 This is a trustworthy saying: “If someone aspires to be a church leader, he desires an honorable position.” 2 So a church leader must be a man whose life is above reproach. He must be faithful to his wife. He must exercise self-control, live wisely, and have a good reputation. He must enjoy having guests in his home, and he must be able to teach. 3 He must not be a heavy drinker or be violent. He must be gentle, not quarrelsome, and not love money. 4 He must manage his own family well, having children who respect and obey him. 5 For if a man cannot manage his own household, how can he take care of God’s church?

6 A church leader must not be a new believer, because he might become proud, and the devil would cause him to fall. 7 Also, people outside the church must speak well of him so that he will not be disgraced and fall into the devil’s trap."
 
A couple years ago, our old pastor was removed from his position after he was found engaging in behavior he should not have been engaging in.

It took a couple years but our church has a new pastor now and I’m starting to have some concerns. He’s younger (I’m guessing late 20s or early 30s) and has some new ideas for the church such as embracing youth outreach and remodeling parts of the building to make it more modern and, as he puts it, “inviting.”

He is working on his doctorate in theology and frequently talks about it from the pulpit and how close he is to earning his degree. I’m concerned that he may be exhibiting signs of pride surrounding this accomplishment.

All this to say I’m concerned about spending church money on unnecessary renovations (the church looks like it was updated 10-15 years ago and doesn’t really need renovations), that he is embracing watered down sermons to appeal to the younger masses, and about the frequency with which he discusses his pursuit of his doctorate. But the biggest concern I have is this: is this an issue of me pointing out his splinter while I have a log in my eye? Am I just being an old grump resisting change? How can I know for sure?

As I write this, I’m realizing the issues I’m bringing up seem mild but it feels like a bigger deal to me for some reason. I’m not really sure how to describe it. Hypothetically, if this is the beginning of a slippery slope and things start getting drastically worse, would it be wise to approach the pastor and share my concerns or better to find a different church to attend? What does the scripture say about the method and appropriateness of confronting church leaders?
pray and your deacons should talk with him voice your concerns to them. the Church has the say on remodel .every thing should be handled in love . Degrees are nice anointing is better, the Holy spirit makes the preacher not the education .
 
Can identify with your position, in certain respects.
Of course you know we are what we eat and it is hard to rise above the level of the feeding.
Scripture does say we should meet together in worship so that is a given. As to where and which fellowship, it must be an individual leading.
Trust you will find the will of the Lord.
 
In the past few years as I have finished my working life and made several changes in residence, I have observed a variety of pastors, some quite new to their ministries.

Some things you need to consider:
There is a difference between sharing ones personal lives with a congregation, as in ones progress thru seminary, and being personally proud of ones accomplishments, or worse claiming authority in ones own person on the basis of those accomplishments -- many in the congregation probably have been studying God's word or a great many years and have a good understanding of both theology and application. If you are forming an opinion, consider whether your preacher is inviting his congregation 'along with him' on his journey or is trying to claim respect he has not earned by pointing to his grades.

Providing for leadership for the young and young adults is not as straight forward as some think. Providing a foundation to the young and newly won individuals and nurturing the fire and commitment of young adults requires very mature leadership. A loving mentor is much better than a friend that happens to be pastor. I saw one young minister who let things get quite out of hand. A young lady (middle school age) came to a point where she requested baptism. I did not know her well and am not commenting on her faith, but soon all the young ladies of that congregation were making the same request. It had become the 'in' thing to do rather than the result of a maturing faith in Christ. A more mature pastor might handle this better.

Building maintenance and other items in their budgets can become quite a point of acrimony in some congregations. Some only want to spend money on visible outreach, and let the building get by with what ever sweat-equity can provide. Some others may wish to have their place of worship be a 'monument to the Lord' and 'visibly announce to the world their devotion to God'. Members are rightly concerned with the course their congregation takes and the budget, both in wealth and in commitment/time, is a handy rudder. Each congregation, with the church leadership playing its role, should chart their course and look for amicable compromises.

All preachers start somewhere. Do not require a newly minted preacher to be as seasoned as a long time pastor with years experience and earned respect.

As far as taking this to the leadership (deacons, or whatever lay leadership you may have) I would say that it is better to discuss this with them in their leadership capacity, and let actions flow from those discussions than it is to either grumble to/with other members or to break fellowship and look for another church family.
 
Maybe just talk to your new pastor instead of us. He might see you as an old grump and stick in the mud (from my POV it does sound a bit like it!) but the thing is he may appreciate discussing with you how to look after the oldies who are now feeling left out.

Young people haven't even lived 10-15 years but it's an entire lifetime for them. If I never bought anything new for my children and just made them read old books all the time it's not going to appeal to them or be relevant. I don't think they'd appreciate being handed the Guinness Book of Records from 2005 and me saying well everything just stopped there! Like it or lump it!
 
A couple years ago, our old pastor was removed from his position after he was found engaging in behavior he should not have been engaging in.

It took a couple years but our church has a new pastor now and I’m starting to have some concerns. He’s younger (I’m guessing late 20s or early 30s) and has some new ideas for the church such as embracing youth outreach and remodeling parts of the building to make it more modern and, as he puts it, “inviting.”

He is working on his doctorate in theology and frequently talks about it from the pulpit and how close he is to earning his degree. I’m concerned that he may be exhibiting signs of pride surrounding this accomplishment.

All this to say I’m concerned about spending church money on unnecessary renovations (the church looks like it was updated 10-15 years ago and doesn’t really need renovations), that he is embracing watered down sermons to appeal to the younger masses, and about the frequency with which he discusses his pursuit of his doctorate. But the biggest concern I have is this: is this an issue of me pointing out his splinter while I have a log in my eye? Am I just being an old grump resisting change? How can I know for sure?

As I write this, I’m realizing the issues I’m bringing up seem mild but it feels like a bigger deal to me for some reason. I’m not really sure how to describe it. Hypothetically, if this is the beginning of a slippery slope and things start getting drastically worse, would it be wise to approach the pastor and share my concerns or better to find a different church to attend? What does the scripture say about the method and appropriateness of confronting church leaders?

It is very common for a man to brag or talk about his accomplishments. That usually can be tempered by older men in the church who can pull him aside and have a man to man talk about what it sounds like to them.

I would also say that it is very, very common to have a new Pastor to want to make HIS mark by starting a new building program.

The default setting to change something is only natural for a good leader. Having a vision means being dissatisfied with the status quo.
However, the down side of that is it can also lead to a "Control Issue".

Something I learned a long time ago is that......."Change is neither good or bad, it is inevitable"!

Now it is just my personal, but a new pastor should not begin his ministry with the words......"We need to build a new building".

My advice is "Patscience". Wait and allow the circumstances to do their work.

Allow me to share this true story with you. My 1st pastorite has two buildings. One was a donated 5 room wood frame house that had been moved to the church location. In it was 4 children's Sunday School rooms and 1 bathroom. When I 1sr walked in I saw that it had NO A/C...NO Heat and there were holes in the floor that had been patched with the lids from canned veggies. (No kidding!).
Several windows had been broken and cracked and patched with duct tape.

I said nothing at all. I did immediately work with the education chairman and we moved the ADULTS to that building and the children to the fellowship hall using particians to separate them. Then I sat back and waited.

After about 6 months, those adults, on their own idea ( get it) decided that WE, the church had to make some changes. THEY then decided that if we were to grow as a church, we had to have a facility that was safe and inviting so the church then built a new 2 story educational building which was paid for the day we opened it.

The Ed. director just sat back and smiled all the way due to just one simple move that forced the people to do what they knew they needed to do!
 
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