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Reflection On Christians Who Reach Retirement

bobinfaith

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Hello brothers and sisters;

Does anyone want to share their experience when reaching retirement from your job (career) or ministry in the church?

There was a time when I looked at anyone over 60, retiring from work and collecting retirement / and social security was regarded as a senior citizen. Now I'm in that category but don't feel like a senior citizen and still feel young, am officially retired from the working field and will collect my first social security check this month.

I'm still serving fulltime in the church and don't feel led to step down, I have been praying to God about a younger minister taking my place when I do step down within the next 8 years.

My wife and I enjoy talking about visiting family more often and taking trips around the United States. She would love to see all 50 states. I would like us to travel to other countries. Of course we have to consider our budget.

What are your thoughts about retirement being Biblical? Does God still have work for even the retired to do for the Kingdom? Or is it ok to just relax while attending church and Bible studies?

I'd love to hear your experience of retirement, what the Bible says and what it means between you and the Lord.

God bless you and your families.
 
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Feb 5, 2019
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Hello brothers and sisters;

Does anyone want to share their experience when reaching retirement from your job (career) or ministry in the church?

There was a time when I looked at anyone over 60, retiring from work and collecting retirement / and social security was regarded as a senior citizen. Now I'm in that category but don't feel like a senior citizen and still feel young, am officially retired from the working field and will collect my first social security check this month.

I'm still serving fulltime in the church and don't feel led to step down, I have been praying to God about a younger minister taking my place when I do step down within the next 8 years.

My wife and I enjoy talking about visiting family more often and taking trips around the United States. She would love to see all 50 states. I would like us to travel to other countries. Of course we have to consider our budget.

What are your thoughts about retirement being Biblical? Does God still have work for even the retired to do for the Kingdom? Or is it ok to just relax while attending church and Bible studies?

I'd love to hear your experience of retirement, what the Bible says and what it means between you and the Lord.

God bless you and your families.
Greetings bobinfaith,

This is a topic I find myself thinking about more and more each day. To start with, I’m not 60 yet, but am getting there and will turn 60 this coming July; good Lord willing. My question now is deciding if I want to aim at collecting social security at 62 or wait to 66.10.

Now, I have many things to be grateful for, not the least of which is that I am retired military and that my military retirement is more than the median household income in Miami (where I currently live) or almost twice as much as in Memphis (where we want to retire). I get our health care insurance through the military/federal government, and the cost cannot be beat by any other source. In your case, living in Daly City, CA, your median income is almost $80k, so you do live in an expensive area, so that has to be taken into consideration.

So, I did the math a while back and, if I do retire at 62, my social security will be less than 66.10, but it would take over 10 years to make it a wash. I talk to many friends, most of which are/have pulled out at 62, as we all know that tomorrow is promised to no one. Now, my wife is a bit younger than I, so she has to wait a while longer. She is 7 years younger and has almost 9 years to go, before reaching her 62-year mark. If there is merit in genealogy; however, I believe I still have at least 20 - 30 years left on this earth, but, again, tomorrow is promised to no one.

I think what we all must consider is when enough is enough. Now, let’s get serious, I just can’t retire at 62 and spend the rest of my life watching TV. I can; however, take on a part-time job and spend the rest of my time volunteering and giving back. With the grace of God, by my 62nd birthday, we will have no outstanding bills and, again with God’s Grace, no major medical issues. While there is no way of knowing what the future is going to be, I am comfortable knowing that, for the most part, the combination of military retirement, VA disability, and social security will be way more than most people make with a full-time salary.

To address your question head on, I think our work on this planet never really has to end. Maybe less focus on the 9 to 5 routine, but there is always a need to help our brothers and sisters. Yes, relaxing and traveling is attractive, but that too has a limit. I still have much that I want to accomplish, but I also just want to walk away from the day-to-day “rat race” and spend more time enjoying the many blessings God has given me and sharing some of those blessings with people I have yet to meet.

Rtm3039
 
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Feb 10, 2015
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Long Post (Apologies)

Retirement is a fundamental change in daily circumstances. Can be good. Can be difficult. A lot depends upon the career one had and one’s commitment to it just as much as the new circumstances.

For myself, I had leveraged a hitch in the Air Force operating Pentagon computers into a career in software development. I enjoyed almost every project I worked on and my career advanced in technical if not managerial complexity. When the economy tanked in the 2007-2009 time range, my job supporting government software projects went away in the fall of 2009. No one was unfair to me. I was working on end-of-life issues for an FAA weather program and was a logical place to cut.

I was (am) still young. I had intended to assess whether it was time to retire when I reached 64 in 2017 but circumstances… Out of a job for the first time since I entered the service in 1975 and unable to find another position in that the Washington economy during times of wholesale cuts, I started to volunteer at the local hospital as well as sorting food at the local food bank.

In the late winter of 2011, I was diagnosed with bladder cancer. The following week I received a couple of calls from my old company and another from a government program manager to come back to work on the follow-on project to the one I had left. I had to decline, since I had to go to chemo therapy and following that, surgery and could not commit to neither full time work nor to the travel the job entailed.

At this point my wife and I figured out that I was retired.

After my cancer was gone (yes all went well, except I wear an appliance) I became involved in the local support group for those with ostomies and related problems (as well as their care givers). I am in no means disabled and after coming to terms with my new reality,

I could go back to work, but although me retirement is not what I had planned either in terms of my activities or in financial terms, there is no real reason to return.

My wife and have recently moved out of the area to the house where my wife grew up. We have been looking for a church and have visited several. I am also looking for volunteer activities. Maybe the Lord will combine the two with me volunteering in some ministry of the new church.

I can now see that my cancer was not a terrible thing. Whether this was God’s plan to get end my career in order to prepare me for the next phase in my life, or if He was merely turning adversity to good, I have felt His support through all of this.

At one point, a friend who was considering my loss of job followed by my health issues, and a few other apparent trials said the he did not know how I could do it. It took me a little pause to realize to what he was referring since my circumstances do not seem a burden.

So…
I loved my job and was good enough at it that both my company and the government agency I supported wanted me for the new project, but that time was at an end. With the faith in the Lord, and the amazing support of my wife, I never despaired and now am embarking on the next phase (whatever the Lord prepares for me).

My advice to anyone that is facing such a transition is to look forward. Do not fret about what you are leaving (good or bad) but take the lessons learned until now and look for opportunities of growth and service.
 
Feb 5, 2019
147
146
43
Miami, FL
Long Post (Apologies)

Retirement is a fundamental change in daily circumstances. Can be good. Can be difficult. A lot depends upon the career one had and one’s commitment to it just as much as the new circumstances.

For myself, I had leveraged a hitch in the Air Force operating Pentagon computers into a career in software development. I enjoyed almost every project I worked on and my career advanced in technical if not managerial complexity. When the economy tanked in the 2007-2009 time range, my job supporting government software projects went away in the fall of 2009. No one was unfair to me. I was working on end-of-life issues for an FAA weather program and was a logical place to cut.

I was (am) still young. I had intended to assess whether it was time to retire when I reached 64 in 2017 but circumstances… Out of a job for the first time since I entered the service in 1975 and unable to find another position in that the Washington economy during times of wholesale cuts, I started to volunteer at the local hospital as well as sorting food at the local food bank.

In the late winter of 2011, I was diagnosed with bladder cancer. The following week I received a couple of calls from my old company and another from a government program manager to come back to work on the follow-on project to the one I had left. I had to decline, since I had to go to chemo therapy and following that, surgery and could not commit to neither full time work nor to the travel the job entailed.

At this point my wife and I figured out that I was retired.

After my cancer was gone (yes all went well, except I wear an appliance) I became involved in the local support group for those with ostomies and related problems (as well as their care givers). I am in no means disabled and after coming to terms with my new reality,

I could go back to work, but although me retirement is not what I had planned either in terms of my activities or in financial terms, there is no real reason to return.

My wife and have recently moved out of the area to the house where my wife grew up. We have been looking for a church and have visited several. I am also looking for volunteer activities. Maybe the Lord will combine the two with me volunteering in some ministry of the new church.

I can now see that my cancer was not a terrible thing. Whether this was God’s plan to get end my career in order to prepare me for the next phase in my life, or if He was merely turning adversity to good, I have felt His support through all of this.

At one point, a friend who was considering my loss of job followed by my health issues, and a few other apparent trials said the he did not know how I could do it. It took me a little pause to realize to what he was referring since my circumstances do not seem a burden.

So…
I loved my job and was good enough at it that both my company and the government agency I supported wanted me for the new project, but that time was at an end. With the faith in the Lord, and the amazing support of my wife, I never despaired and now am embarking on the next phase (whatever the Lord prepares for me).

My advice to anyone that is facing such a transition is to look forward. Do not fret about what you are leaving (good or bad) but take the lessons learned until now and look for opportunities of growth and service.
Thank you for putting this subject in proper perspective.

rtm3039
 
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Sep 3, 2009
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Hello brothers and sisters;

Does anyone want to share their experience when reaching retirement from your job (career) or ministry in the church?

There was a time when I looked at anyone over 60, retiring from work and collecting retirement / and social security was regarded as a senior citizen. Now I'm in that category but don't feel like a senior citizen and still feel young, am officially retired from the working field and will collect my first social security check this month.

I'm still serving fulltime in the church and don't feel led to step down, I have been praying to God about a younger minister taking my place when I do step down within the next 8 years.

My wife and I enjoy talking about visiting family more often and taking trips around the United States. She would love to see all 50 states. I would like us to travel to other countries. Of course we have to consider our budget.

What are your thoughts about retirement being Biblical? Does God still have work for even the retired to do for the Kingdom? Or is it ok to just relax while attending church and Bible studies?

I'd love to hear your experience of retirement, what the Bible says and what it means between you and the Lord.

God bless you and your families.
Funny that you should ask. I am in exactly the same position except I am much older than you. I have been at my present church now for 23 years.

I did begin to receive SS at 62. Income is not an issue with us at this time as the Lord has blessed us in many financial ways. But every time I have thought that it would be nice to sit back and let someone else do what has to be done, the church throws more money at us.

Because of medical reasons, some mine and some my wife's I have tried to retire from the ministry a couple of times. It caused so much turmoil inside the congregation that I relented and kept on going.

For years I kept my church office hours from 9 to around 3 or 5 for 4 days a week, but The church has demanded that I cut back on my working days at my office and our deacons have pretty much taken over the visitation duties I had. Now I only come in to my office 1 or 2 days a week and only for a couple of hours as I have a wonderful secretary who keeps everything organized.

Now you asked, Is retirement biblical? There is certainly not a prohibition of it in the Bible. The truth is, it simply is not discussed in any degree of context. In fact, as far as I can tell, there is only one reference to what we understand as retirement in the Bible. This is found in the book of Numbers in relationship to those involved in the Levitical priesthood services of the Tabernacle in the wilderness and later of the Temple in Jerusalem. Here the Bible states:

This is what applies to the Levites: from twenty-five years old and upward they shall enter to perform service in the work of the tent of meeting. But at the age of fifty years they shall retire from service in the work and not work anymore. (Numbers 8:24-25 NASB).

The reason God gave this directive to the priests of the Temple is shrouded in silence.

And yet, nowhere do we read in the Bible where the Christian minister is to “retire” from his calling or his service to Christ and the church.

IMO, No minister of the Gospel should think about “retiring”. However, now that I have grown older I can see that health issues such as eyesight and memory loss, and confusion can cause any of us to consider retiring BUT NOT walking away from service.

Instead of retiring we should put the focus on “retooling” which could potentially take place during those “retirement” years.
 
Dec 19, 2014
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I am not of retirement age but worked in many retirement villages and got to observe the 'oldies' there, and also a church I attended has many oldies. I think as people get older they have an opportunity to redeem the time, they can work part time as their bodies are slowing down and also teach the younger. In the Bible Titus tells the aged women to teach the younger women how to love their husbands ..,isnt that important?!

When Jesus left to go to heaven he had John look after his mother. I think companionship is also very important as people get older esp for those who may be widowed, one of the reasons many people move to retirement villages is they want to be around other people and not isolated, which can happen as children leave the nest. But what you can do is adopt other children into your home and show christian hospitality.

As for working yes God calls us to work six days and rest on the seventh, every fitieth year was a jubilee, some people work wayyy to hard all their lives and their bodies break down from over work. The 23rd psalm tells us that the Lord leads us to green pastures and makes us lie down. We need the rest!

Why did Paul take on Timothy who was much younger to teach the gospel could it be Paul was getting on a bit and wanted Gods work to carry on...young people are crying out for older people to actually take the time to teach them all the wisdom they have learned not just tell them oh go watch tv, learn it yourself or pay someone else to do it!

I find that one shouldnt worry about oneself but sadly thats a trap many people fall into when they retire, they become quite selfish about it, or they dont want to let go of things..which can be a nightmare for people (hoarders anyone?) looking out for their safety.

In todays world it seems the baby boomers had it so easy they got all the priveliges it might not be the case for furture generations who may not even have a pension. They had job security, social security...people these days do not have it. A company or govt job is not even guaranteed. Sadly the legacy of that generation doesnt necessarily pass on to the next when people decide to sell up.

Visiting and travelling is what many people do but hows about spreading the gospel? Why, when travel is easier than ever, are not more people spreading the gospel to the ends of the earth..thats an opportunity right there. I would love to see groups of christian oldies, who arent tied down with family commitments, spread the gospel together.

I dont know about the church throwing money at people, never happened to me! I probably wouldnt accept it anyway. If you do receive I think would just look at it as reimbursement for time youve spent doing ministry. Or it could be they want to honor you!

The oldies I know do things like knit for charities, garden and share their produce, teach bibles in school, sit on boards of trustees, go on organised outings (the younger ones drive the vans) host bible studies, and look after grandchildren and great grandchildren. In the OT Joseph had his on his knee and Isaac blessed his children. JObs children gained an inheritance.
They join volunteer groups like probus and rotary. They write and lobby govts for change. They want to leave the world a better place for the next generation. They are not living for themselves...they are living life to the full.

The Bible has actually quite a lot to say about elders in the church...the church needs elders! And because you may not be paid, you not doing it for the money you are not under constraint but doing it willingly! You are feeding the flock. See Peter chapter 5.
I really dont believe that people ought to look at ministry as a job one can retire from. Thats like saying to a mother just stop being a mother. Anyone whos a true mother just doesnt stop being a mother even when her own children are grown.
 
Feb 24, 2011
10
3
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65
Northern California
Hello brothers and sisters;

Does anyone want to share their experience when reaching retirement from your job (career) or ministry in the church?

There was a time when I looked at anyone over 60, retiring from work and collecting retirement / and social security was regarded as a senior citizen. Now I'm in that category but don't feel like a senior citizen and still feel young, am officially retired from the working field and will collect my first social security check this month.

I'm still serving fulltime in the church and don't feel led to step down, I have been praying to God about a younger minister taking my place when I do step down within the next 8 years.

My wife and I enjoy talking about visiting family more often and taking trips around the United States. She would love to see all 50 states. I would like us to travel to other countries. Of course we have to consider our budget.

What are your thoughts about retirement being Biblical? Does God still have work for even the retired to do for the Kingdom? Or is it ok to just relax while attending church and Bible studies?

I'd love to hear your experience of retirement, what the Bible says and what it means between you and the Lord.

God bless you and your families.
I have heard it said that a Christian should never retire, or never consider themselves retired. The idea seems to be that retirement means decommissioning one's self from serving God...as if working at a career, even in ministry, were the only way to service. And when I say "service", I mean in the classic Christian sense, like a job in the church, etc.. But that is so wrong.

That would be like saying a child should not have a childhood, because he should serve in the church as long as he is able, even as a child. Where that sounds cute or swell, it is a complete misunderstanding of God's well designed intentions for the seasons of our life. Likewise, the golden years of retirement are a season that is not intended to be a time of labor or even creativity or productivity. No, on the contrary, if everyone whom God has given breath thought they were to be busy doing the heavy lifting...they would be wrong. God has other plans. Don't mess with that. Don't mess with perfection. Not even. "Well done, good and faithful servant; you were faithful over a few things, I will make you ruler over many things. Enter into the joy of your lord" comes to the living, not the dead. Hence, He has manifest a second childhood. How perfect is that?
 
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Aug 23, 2016
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Firstly, I am so pleased to see you here again, Lanolin. Bless you.
Back to retirement, though :

I retired at 60, which was 34 years ago, and this theme has started my thoughts on an unusual track.
I have often wondered what Jesus would have made of old age, and have been led to think that, being so human, he would have needed to live a different life if His Father had not planned to take Him home when at His peak of physical and mental ability.

As I came near to retirement age, I opted out of 38 years of the development of military equipment, and worked in the local Hospital, mending people instead of killing them.

But that was a chance to start preaching and as a lay pastor, I assumed the upkeep of a small church, looking after it with little help, installing fittings at my own expense, and visiting each member during each week.
I was able to play for services and repair every electronic and pipe organ, compile and print hundreds of copies of the preaching plan every quarter for seven other churches, edit and produce the weekly notice-sheets, and preach at churches up to 50 miles away, on most Sundays. I was able to arrange morning prayer meetings and install amplification and loop systems in several churches, some at my expense.

Fortunately, my wife changed her agenda when I retired and gave local talks to women's meetings and we went to church renewal weekends into many different counties. All well and good, until she needed the care of a nursing home. That cut down my spare time as I was with her for eight hours every day for three years, but I found I could put forward the Christian message on wikis by working on my tablet from her bedside.
After 66 years of equally yoked marriage, I moved into supported accommodation when she died, and I now find myself being guided into answered prayer without being able to venture out of my rooms.

Many of the comments of others above have hovered over financial support, but the Lord has seen to it that in every situation I have been given just enough to serve His purpose in His Plan for me, and I am still able to manage with the help of my daughter and two sons as I have their daily visits and prayers.

Please understand that I am not boasting but trying to show that there is a definite Plan for each of us, and that plan will continue into our ripe old age if it is designed to do so.
 

bobinfaith

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I am not of retirement age but worked in many retirement villages and got to observe the 'oldies' there, and also a church I attended has many oldies. I think as people get older they have an opportunity to redeem the time, they can work part time as their bodies are slowing down and also teach the younger. In the Bible Titus tells the aged women to teach the younger women how to love their husbands ..,isnt that important?!
Firstly, I am so pleased to see you here again, Lanolin. Bless you.
Back to retirement, though : I retired at 60, which was 34 years ago, and this theme has started my thoughts on an unusual track. I have often wondered what Jesus would have made of old age; Many of the comments of others above have hovered over financial support, but the Lord has seen to it that in every situation I have been given just enough to serve His purpose in His Plan for me, and I am still able to manage with the help of my daughter and two sons as I have their daily visits and prayers.
Hello Lanolin;

Its a blessing to fellowship with you again and enjoyed reading your post. What spoke to me was your sharing of the opportunities retirees still have to serve the Lord. We may retire from our career jobs which is a ministry in itself, however, serving our families, churches, communities and across the nations is ongoing. God bless you, Lanolin.

Hello Smiley;

Thank you for sharing your wonderful testimony and pastoral ministry. Many of the posts including mine did mention our financials and Jesus taught to be good stewards helping the poor, the hungry and benevolence.
Finances is just one area of retirement and how do we manage the Lord's provisions provided in our retirement?
It's always good to fellowship with you, Smiley.

God bless you and your families.
 

bobinfaith

Senior Moderator
Staff member
Senior Moderator
I have heard it said that a Christian should never retire, or never consider themselves retired. The idea seems to be that retirement means decommissioning one's self from serving God...as if working at a career, even in ministry, were the only way to service. And when I say "service", I mean in the classic Christian sense, like a job in the church, etc.. But that is so wrong.

That would be like saying a child should not have a childhood, because he should serve in the church as long as he is able, even as a child. Where that sounds cute or swell, it is a complete misunderstanding of God's well designed intentions for the seasons of our life. Likewise, the golden years of retirement are a season that is not intended to be a time of labor or even creativity or productivity. No, on the contrary, if everyone whom God has given breath thought they were to be busy doing the heavy lifting...they would be wrong. God has other plans. Don't mess with that. Don't mess with perfection. Not even. "Well done, good and faithful servant; you were faithful over a few things, I will make you ruler over many things. Enter into the joy of your lord" comes to the living, not the dead. Hence, He has manifest a second childhood. How perfect is that?
Hello ScottA;

I'm just entering retirement from my career work, but my wife, the community and church ministries continues. i enjoyed reading your post. It blessed me and gave extra food for thought.

God bless you and your family, brother.
 
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Dec 19, 2014
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God will provide whatever we need at the different times of our life also He knows how long we live. I once did a course in money management and people were advised to save for retirement often by snake oil financial advisors who bankrupted them when they gave control of their finances over to a third party promising riches. Thats cos they trusted in man and money rather than God. I think people worry and fret too much over this. I also see many retirees who have more money than sense and blow it all on leisure. I met many of such on a cruise ship that had been on it several times and they were gambling at the casino! Am not judging but...I kind of wondered about that. I mean most people know casinos are rigged for people to lose...

I reckon Jesus knew that Mary would need companionship and another son to mother after he left, thats why he gave her John. Jesus wasnt worrying about money at all. I dont think he ever looked at his carpenter jobs as security or wanted to go back. Also none of the apostles after commissioning went back to fishing and Paul didnt go back to tent making. They didnt think oh what am I going to do now? What Jesus said to Peter was if you love me, feed my sheep, feed my lambs. And then he said when you were young you dress yourself and going wherever you wanted but when you are old another shall dress you to take you where you may not want to go.

If when you are old you are too proud to accept help thats going to be difficult for you because there are people who want to care for you. People think independence is a good thing when young snd want to stay that way forever but as we get older actually our dependence on God is greater.


Jesus did know when he was going to die and went forth not afraid of it and doing His Fathers will, why, because he knew he was going to be raised. He accepted he would suffer and be on that cross, and not be able to do anything on his own strength. I mean he couldnt come down from the cross even when others mocked him and asked him if he was the son of God why not just jump off the cross. Jesus also didnt expect to be bailed out of jail either with cash? He could have offered more than 30 pieces of silver to spare his life. If he was a rich man maybe he could have dodged the charge? He did not even prepare a funeral plot a rich man offered one for him after he was dead.

But I did see so many baby boomers/retirees thinking they can live like no tomorrow, ignore God and cheat death and not ever have to take up their cross to follow Him. Anyway just some further thoughts. One of the villages i worked in had a high turnover of managers and one was actually fired for stealing money or embezzling from the village. There are many Judas that prey on oldies cos they see them as a cash cow. So just warning you that get away from the idea that money can save you.
 
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Nov 30, 2007
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Fairbanks Alaska
I'm in my 60s now. I retired at age 46. I became both mom and dad and raised my kids. I was on many PTA boards, I helped in the classrooms, I was a girl scout troop leader, cub scout den leader, I served on numerous non profit Boards, I was a coach, a chaperone, and the list goes on. My youngest kids are in college now, I recently resigned from the last Board I was serving on. This year I began what I call my second retirement. During this period I intend to support my children as they finish college, and help them as needed. I plan to travel to visit family a couple of times a year, and I'm spending time cleaning out the home and taking actions that should make my estate easy to settle for whomever ends up with that burden.

I'm living a dream in a log cabin on 10+ acres in interior Alaska but I'm starting to look to a day when I'll no longer be physically capable of maintaining the property. Looking forward, I'm beginning to look for another good place to live should I feel compeled to leave my current situation.
 
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Dec 19, 2014
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One of my friends whos retired says her husband coaches a lot of sports now hes retired, and helps out with the athletics club. My dad volunteers with a tramway museum, he drives the tram.

I think volunteering is valuable and rewarding for retirees, whether its church ministries or out in the community. For someone who might have had a long career and doesnt want to completley step away from it, maybe consider becoming a mentor for young people who are just entering it. Like a vocation or career guidance.

Like Paul giving advice and support to Timothy as he stepped up to be a teacher. Young people need elders to encourage them. They might not get it from their own parents.
 
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Feb 5, 2013
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Hello brothers and sisters;

Does anyone want to share their experience when reaching retirement from your job (career) or ministry in the church?

There was a time when I looked at anyone over 60, retiring from work and collecting retirement / and social security was regarded as a senior citizen. Now I'm in that category but don't feel like a senior citizen and still feel young, am officially retired from the working field and will collect my first social security check this month.

I'm still serving fulltime in the church and don't feel led to step down, I have been praying to God about a younger minister taking my place when I do step down within the next 8 years.

My wife and I enjoy talking about visiting family more often and taking trips around the United States. She would love to see all 50 states. I would like us to travel to other countries. Of course we have to consider our budget.

What are your thoughts about retirement being Biblical? Does God still have work for even the retired to do for the Kingdom? Or is it ok to just relax while attending church and Bible studies?

I'd love to hear your experience of retirement, what the Bible says and what it means between you and the Lord.

God bless you and your families.
God bless your ministry! I am no where close to retirement age and I am not in ministry. But I do know my Pastor retired recently mainly due to health issues. He was unable to travel far to visit people when they call for needs and he was finding it very hard to stand and preach for long hours. God provided him strength to overcome all those weakness until another Pastor was identified. I used to talk with him about retirement and how it would be. And how it is now that he has retired. He certainly misses teaching and all the ministry work. But he told me that he is realizing there is no true retirement. As brother Major said, it is retooling. In other words Pastors are repurposed into a different form of ministry. Now that he is retired, he goes on cruise more often that he would. They would have him to Bible studies, preach at Chaplin and so on. he has more time to interact with people at stores and talk about Jesus. He has a different role in talking with members of Church and helping them out on spiritual matters. In some ways it feels limited, but there is no end to ministry itself. I am sure God has wonderful plans for you and your wife!
 
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bobinfaith

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God bless your ministry! I am no where close to retirement age and I am not in ministry. But I do know my Pastor retired recently mainly due to health issues. He was unable to travel far to visit people when they call for needs and he was finding it very hard to stand and preach for long hours. God provided him strength to overcome all those weakness until another Pastor was identified. I used to talk with him about retirement and how it would be. And how it is now that he has retired. He certainly misses teaching and all the ministry work. But he told me that he is realizing there is no true retirement. As brother Major said, it is retooling. In other words Pastors are repurposed into a different form of ministry. Now that he is retired, he goes on cruise more often that he would. They would have him to Bible studies, preach at Chaplin and so on. he has more time to interact with people at stores and talk about Jesus. He has a different role in talking with members of Church and helping them out on spiritual matters. In some ways it feels limited, but there is no end to ministry itself. I am sure God has wonderful plans for you and your wife!
Hello Ravindran;

I agree with you and what others have posted, despite our current standing there is no end to ministry itself. I have enjoyed reading the different posts that may give us all and myself time for thought.

I have a very good friend, mentor and retired pastor who celebrated his last day at the church that he served for 23 years. He has more time to fix up his small house, visit he and his wife's grandchildren, but is still asked to preach at different churches and have a cup of coffee with people in the community. God bless him for that and this inspires me.

Thank you for your post, Ravindran. Its a pleasure to serve with you here. You say you aren't in ministry, but aren't you serving in the church or community - visitations, Bible studies, children or youth visits?

God bless you and your family.
 
Apr 13, 2019
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Yuma, AZ USA
Luke 15:12 King James Version (KJV)
12 And the younger of them said to his father, Father, give me the portion of goods that falleth to me. And he divided unto them his living.

In biblical times, retirement was when a man divided his estate among his sons and they supported him after that. Except for the one in this story.
 
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Dec 19, 2014
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They call many baby boom retirees skiers. Because they Spend the Kids Inheritance.

Not sure if this is reference to themselves or they spend it on their kids while they still alive, which could be a good thing or bad thing depending on how you look at it. Usually an inheritance is only given upon death.
 
Apr 13, 2019
56
29
18
79
Yuma, AZ USA
They call many baby boom retirees skiers. Because they Spend the Kids Inheritance.

Not sure if this is reference to themselves or they spend it on their kids while they still alive, which could be a good thing or bad thing depending on how you look at it. Usually an inheritance is only given upon death.
That is a very common misconception. "Spending the kids' inheritance" refers to tax-and-spend policies that do not produce anything of value. They merely rob the children of their inheritance.