Strong's "Reverse" Concordance

#1
Hello,
I'm wondering if there is an online Strong's Condordance that would allow you to look up all the words that use a particular word as their root. So if you know the number of the root word, is there a way to find all the numbers of the words that use that number/word as their root?

Thanks.
 
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#4
Hello,
I'm wondering if there is an online Strong's Condordance that would allow you to look up all the words that use a particular word as their root. So if you know the number of the root word, is there a way to find all the numbers of the words that use that number/word as their root?

Thanks.
TheWord.net is what I use, though it's not "online" but free to download.
 
#5
Hello,
I'm wondering if there is an online Strong's Condordance that would allow you to look up all the words that use a particular word as their root. So if you know the number of the root word, is there a way to find all the numbers of the words that use that number/word as their root?

Thanks.

I've never heard of anything that can do this. I am also curious as to why someone would want this type of tool...purely curious, not suggesting anything wrong :)
 
#6
Yeah, I can't find anything like it. I'm kind of surprised it's not out there considering the capabilities of computer technology. But I suppose not too many people wouuld use it.

I look up the Greek and Hebrew meanings of a lot of words in order to get the strictest meaning. I have come across several instances where I felt the need to see where a root word is being used to help broaden it's possible definition and use. Plus, it would help link certain scriptures together. I have been studying several times and have come across a root word that I know I have come across before in my studies but can't remember what scripture/word I was studying that brought me to that root word. So if I could go backwards, I could find the original Strong's word that I was studying previously and compare that scripture/word with the one I'm currently studying (for a possible link). Anyway, hope that makes some sort of sense.
 

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#7
I have an app called My sword. It has the strongs which will give you a list of where in the scriptures the word was used along with the definition. Would this help?

G4655
Original: σκότος

Transliteration: skotos

Phonetic: skot'-os

Thayer Definition:

  1. darkness
    1. of night darkness
    2. of darkened eyesight or blindness
  2. metaphorically
    1. of ignorance respecting divine things and human duties, and the accompanying ungodliness and immorality, together with their consequent misery in hell
    2. persons in whom darkness becomes visible and holds sway
Origin: from the base of G4639

TDNT entry: 14:03,1

Part(s) of speech: Noun Neuter

Strong's Definition: From the base of G4639; shadiness, that is, obscurity (literally or figuratively): - darkness.

Total KJV Occurrences: 32

darkness (19)
Mat 4:16; Mat 8:12; Mat 22:13; Mat 25:30; Mat 27:45; Mar 15:33; Luk 1:79; Luk 11:35; Joh 3:19; Act 2:20; Act 26:18; Rom 2:19; 2Co 4:6; 2Co 6:14; Eph 5:8; 1Th 5:4; Heb 12:18; 1Pe 2:9; 1Jn 1:6(refs19)

be darkness (1)
Mat 6:23

is that darkness (1)
Mat 6:23

of darkness (8)
Luk 22:53; Rom 13:12; 1Co 4:5; Eph 5:11; Col 1:13; 1Th 5:5; 2Pe 2:17; Jud 1:13 (refs8)

a darkness (2)
Luk 23:44; Act 13:11 (refs2)

of the darkness (1)
Eph 6:12
 
#8
Yeah, I can't find anything like it. I'm kind of surprised it's not out there considering the capabilities of computer technology. But I suppose not too many people wouuld use it.

I look up the Greek and Hebrew meanings of a lot of words in order to get the strictest meaning.
sure to also learn about how the gender of a word sometimes changes it's meaning. The Strong's will mention some of that but will have to seek other resources to get the fuller picture. Also, be careful not to get into what's called "root fallacy" which is basically where some people look to the definition of a root word to change the meaning of the word created from the root.
 
#9
I have an app called My sword. It has the strongs which will give you a list of where in the scriptures the word was used along with the definition. Would this help?

G4655
Original: σκότος

Transliteration: skotos

Phonetic: skot'-os

Thayer Definition:

  1. darkness
    1. of night darkness
    2. of darkened eyesight or blindness
  2. metaphorically
    1. of ignorance respecting divine things and human duties, and the accompanying ungodliness and immorality, together with their consequent misery in hell
    2. persons in whom darkness becomes visible and holds sway
Origin: from the base of G4639

TDNT entry: 14:03,1

Part(s) of speech: Noun Neuter

Strong's Definition: From the base of G4639; shadiness, that is, obscurity (literally or figuratively): - darkness.

Total KJV Occurrences: 32

darkness (19)
Mat 4:16; Mat 8:12; Mat 22:13; Mat 25:30; Mat 27:45; Mar 15:33; Luk 1:79; Luk 11:35; Joh 3:19; Act 2:20; Act 26:18; Rom 2:19; 2Co 4:6; 2Co 6:14; Eph 5:8; 1Th 5:4; Heb 12:18; 1Pe 2:9; 1Jn 1:6(refs19)

be darkness (1)
Mat 6:23

is that darkness (1)
Mat 6:23

of darkness (8)
Luk 22:53; Rom 13:12; 1Co 4:5; Eph 5:11; Col 1:13; 1Th 5:5; 2Pe 2:17; Jud 1:13 (refs8)

a darkness (2)
Luk 23:44; Act 13:11 (refs2)

of the darkness (1)
Eph 6:12
Yeah, I use something similar online. What I am looking for would be a way to look up the number G4639 (in your example) and see what other words use that "root" word G4639.
 
#10
sure to also learn about how the gender of a word sometimes changes it's meaning. The Strong's will mention some of that but will have to seek other resources to get the fuller picture. Also, be careful not to get into what's called "root fallacy" which is basically where some people look to the definition of a root word to change the meaning of the word created from the root.
Yeah, I hear you. Also, the tenses of the words. i was recently studying the "Aorist" tense in the Greek which is an indefinite tense. It's a mind boggling tense with regard to the Word of God. I use a Greek Interlinear online version of the Bible to see the gender, tense, etc. of each word. I"ve noticed some of the Bible translations aren't exactly correct in some cases so I look words up and let the Spirit behind the words bear witness to what the scripture is saying.
 
#11
Yeah, I hear you. Also, the tenses of the words. i was recently studying the "Aorist" tense in the Greek which is an indefinite tense. It's a mind boggling tense with regard to the Word of God. I use a Greek Interlinear online version of the Bible to see the gender, tense, etc. of each word. I"ve noticed some of the Bible translations aren't exactly correct in some cases so I look words up and let the Spirit behind the words bear witness to what the scripture is saying.
Yep, tenses make a lot of difference too. A couple interesting things to study would be the "create evil" in the OT (evil being in the masculine form) and "I and my father are one (hen vs. heis)" both of these are examples of genders affecting what things actually mean. Can't think of a tense example.
 
#12
Yep, tenses make a lot of difference too. A couple interesting things to study would be the "create evil" in the OT (evil being in the masculine form) and "I and my father are one (hen vs. heis)" both of these are examples of genders affecting what things actually mean. Can't think of a tense example.
Oh yeah, for sure. With regard to the tenses, I was just surprised that it looks like there really isn't a "past tense" in the ancient Greek-at least I haven't come across one yet in the scriptures. Any word in the scripture that you would think should be past tense is listed in the Aorist tense. Anyway, pretty crazy stuff!
 
#13
This is kind of a related question... Is there a version of the Old Testament that shows the tenses, plurality, gender, etc. of the words? I have one for the New Testament but can't seem to find one for the Old Testament Hebrew. I'm currently interested in Isaiah 53: 7-9.
Thanks.
 
#14
blueletterbible.com and biblehub.com will show the genders etc for words in the OT.

At biblehub type in the verse, then click on interlinear and it will show beneath each word.
 
#15
Thanks. I use Blue Letter Bible quite often but can't seem to find this information. Do you know where it's at on there? Sorry for all the questions.....
 
#16
I don't see it on BibleHub eitehr. On their Greek Interlinear version, it has the Strong's number, the Hebrew, English and hten just says "noun" or "verb" or whatever. Nothing about tense, gender, plurality, etc. I must be missing something I guess....
 
#17
I don't see it on BibleHub eitehr. On their Greek Interlinear version, it has the Strong's number, the Hebrew, English and hten just says "noun" or "verb" or whatever. Nothing about tense, gender, plurality, etc. I must be missing something I guess....
Click on PARSE, right side.
 
#19
What word are you looking up, just as an example?
It might be easier to go to a greek dictionary first. Or a bible dictionary? I dont use a concordance, I remember a workmate lent me one and it was huge but you could look up things in reverse. Might be easier with the actual book.

What I find more fruitful is reading the scripture and asking God to show me rather than get hung up on individual words, because the context always gives the meaning. If you have a clear translation its not confusing.

A simple dictionary will show you what 'gender' a word is plus any plural forms. Then just look that word up in the bible, either go to the greek version or just look up the english translation, but sometimes you need to remember thst there isnt always a direct english translation of that word. Sometimes its an anglicised version of the greek, or the english has more words for that single greek word, and if you have a clear translation, those words will be in italics. English has many phrasal verbs that in another language they would just use one word.

Also in english there is no clear gender differentiation but I wasnt aware that the greek or hebrew had that and if it makes any difference to the meaning of the word. I mean in french for example a cat is chat and its 'un' or 'le' denoting masculine but that does not mean literally the cat itself is male or female could be either.
 
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#20
Also in english there is no clear gender differentiation but I wasnt aware that the greek or hebrew had that and if it makes any difference to the meaning of the word. I mean in french for example a cat is chat and its 'un' or 'le' denoting masculine but that does not mean literally the cat itself is male or female could be either.
The problem stems from poor translation from Hebrew and Greek to English.
Another problem is when we take words from the Bible and place modern day definition of the word.