Explanations For Genesis 6:

May 19, 2012
3,956
1,255
113
66
#21
The Hebrew term Midrash[pronunciation?] (Hebrew: מדרש‎; plural midrashim, "story" from "to investigate" or "study") also "Interpretation" or "Exposition"[1] is a homiletic method of biblical exegesis. The term also refers to the whole compilation of homiletic teachings on the Bible.
Midrash is a way of interpreting biblical stories that goes beyond simple distillation of religious, legal, or moral teachings. It fills in many gaps left in the biblical narrative regarding events and personalities that are only hinted at.[2]
The original purpose of midrash was to resolve problems in the interpretation of difficult passages of the text of the Hebrew Bible, using Rabbinic principles of hermeneutics and philology to align them with the religious and ethical values of religious teachers. This method of interpretation was eventually expanded "to provide scriptural pretexts to justify oral tradition".[


That's from wikipedia. My understanding of midrash is exactly this. Christ, after casting out a demon, referred to Solomon. His listeners understood his reference as they were all familiar with the Midrash story that Solomon used Fallen Angels/Demons to build the first temple. Christ was saying if you think Solomon could control demons - look at this. These "stories" teachings go back thousands of years, unlike Mr.Henry, and involve many, many rabbi's handing these stories down - as an accumulation not as a pick and choose fest.

The angels in the Lot story of Sodom/Gomorah musta looked like they had the same equipment as humans or they wouldnb't have wanted them for party favors.
 
Jan 11, 2013
2,726
357
83
65
South East Asia
#22
Sorry Silk, but Matthew 12 is about Christ's wisdom being superior to Solomon's wisdom, not demonic architects.He is also pointing out the lengths non-Jews went to hear a minor prophet as opposed to how standoffish the Jews were to His vastly superior teachings and character.

This logic attempt you are suggesting is like saying the story of the demons cast into swine is about hog over population reduction through demonology.:oops:

Please reread the whole chapter 12 and see what I mean. Especially verse 42 in the whole chapter's context.
 
May 19, 2012
3,956
1,255
113
66
#23
Shakes head. No Rusty while I agree that Christ's wisdom trumped Solomon, the reference he made was about demons, plain and simple. Why don't you re-read with new eyes? He was simply making a reference his listeners knew, altho modern day readers don't have.
 
Jul 22, 2010
3,161
1,232
113
72
Australia
#25
Silk,
Tit 1:13 This testimony is true. Therefore rebuke them sharply, that they may be sound in the faith,
Tit 1:14 not devoting themselves to Jewish myths and the commands of people who turn away from the truth.
To what Jewish fables or myths was Paul referring?
Could the answer be any myths that turn people away from truth?
 
May 19, 2012
3,956
1,255
113
66
#26
What I said was that Christ was making reference to Solomon using demons, something that was well known in his time and among his listeners. He was making a direct connections between demons and Solomon. Not wisdom - altho he might have been saying don't try to use demons as a work force but rather get rid of them. After all look what happened to the 1st temple and according to the midrash - Solomon, in his old age, ended up crazy, having lost all his wisdom. All for playing with demons
 
May 19, 2012
3,956
1,255
113
66
#28
Gonna give it one more shot. Contextually, what is more likely, that Christ, after casting out demon(s), would reference Solomon because of wisdom or his connection to demons?
 
Jul 22, 2010
3,161
1,232
113
72
Australia
#29
Silk! can't you see that you are romancing myth and fables?
Rusty pointed out this passage for your study:
Mat 12:42 The queen of the South will rise up at the judgment with this generation and condemn it, for she came from the ends of the earth to hear the wisdom of Solomon, and behold, something greater than Solomon is here.

Question: Why did the queen of the South come from the ends of the Earth?
Answer: To hear Solomon's wisdom. Not to play footsie with any pet demons he might have had sleeping over.
Question: In what way did Jesus compare Himself to Solomon?
Answer: He has greater wisdom than even Solomon had.
Question: Why will this queen of the South rise up in judgment?
Answer: Because even from afar she could recognize wisdom whereas those rabbinical dullards could not even when face to face with it.
Love these monkey see monkey do studies;)
 
Amens/Likes: Major and Rusty
Jul 22, 2010
3,161
1,232
113
72
Australia
#30
I think the umbrage was dismissing commentary as myth.
Did you take umbrage? I thought some went missing.:)

Rusty, I have looked on the web for info on the midrash. While not an exhaustive search, I have found nothing that suggested to me that commentary was an appropriate description. Hence my slightly less than approving reception.
I have not yet had the time to pay you the courtesy of following your link, but I do intend to.
 
Jan 11, 2013
2,726
357
83
65
South East Asia
#32
Right-O Calvin...Ya nailed it!

Gotta look at the Wiki page on this one: it depends on what edition/era of the Midrash we are talking about.
Frankly, Hebrew scholarship is so convoluted it would make a Jesuit weep, but this is a good nutshell definition: from http://tinyurl.com/9wtr39e

The Hebrew term Midras (Hebrew: מדרש‎; plural midrashim, "story" from "to investigate" or "study") also "Interpretation" or "Exposition"[1] is a homiletic method of biblical exegesis. The term also refers to the whole compilation of homiletic teachings on the Bible.
Midrash is a way of interpreting biblical stories that goes beyond simple distillation of religious, legal, or moral teachings. It fills in many gaps left in the biblical narrative regarding events and personalities that are only hinted at.[2]
The original purpose of midrash was to resolve problems in the interpretation of difficult passages of the text of the Hebrew Bible, using Rabbinic principles of hermeneutics and philology to align them with the religious and ethical values of religious teachers.

This method of interpretation was eventually expanded "to provide scriptural pretexts to justify oral tradition".
The last sentence was what I meant earlier when I explained that the commentary, later in history, became muddled with the myths of the Zohor.