Israeli Food And Recipes

#2
salad.jpg This is a staple of most Israeli's In Hebrew its called 'Salat Kitsus' or chopped salad. The finer the cubed tomatoes and cucumber the more skill is demonstrated.
3 medium cucumbers cubed
2 large tomatoes cubed (de seed if you want to be fancy)
1 small red onion finely chopped
small bunch coriander/cilantro chopped
1/2 bunch fresh mint chopped
juice of one lemon
olive oil
salt and pepper to taste
Mix all prepared ingrediants. Season. Chill and serve!
Goes perfect with Hummus and Falafel balls with fresh pita bread.
Enjoy
 
#4
baba-ganoush.jpg
Baba Ganoush / Salat Hatzelim
This recipe is for another staple of Israeli life, the smokey aubergine pate.
Variations of this divine dish can be found all over the world not just the Middle East.
  • 3 medium-sized eggplants
  • 1/2 cup tahini
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons coarse salt
  • 3 tablespoons freshly-squeezed lemon juice
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed
  • 1/8 teaspoon chile powder
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • a half bunch cilantro leaves

1. Preheat the oven to 375F (190C).

2. Prick each eggplant a few times, then char the outside of the eggplants by placing them directly on the flame of a gas burner and as the skin chars, turn them until the eggplants are uniformly-charred on the outside. (If you don’t have a gas stove, you can char them under the broiler. If not, skip to the next step.)

3. Place the eggplants on a baking sheet and roast in the oven for 20 to 30 minutes, until they’re completely soft; you should be able to easily poke a paring knife into them and meet no resistance.

4. Remove from oven and let cool.

5. Split the eggplant and scrape out the pulp. Puree the pulp in a blender or food processor with the other ingredients until smooth.

6. Taste, and season with additional salt and lemon juice, if necessary. Serve drizzled with olive oil and served with pita.
 
#5
View attachment 735 This is a staple of most Israeli's In Hebrew its called 'Salat Kitsus' or chopped salad. The finer the cubed tomatoes and cucumber the more skill is demonstrated.
3 medium cucumbers cubed
2 large tomatoes cubed (de seed if you want to be fancy)
1 small red onion finely chopped
small bunch coriander/cilantro chopped
1/2 bunch fresh mint chopped
juice of one lemon
olive oil
salt and pepper to taste
Mix all prepared ingrediants. Season. Chill and serve!
Goes perfect with Hummus and Falafel balls with fresh pita bread.
Enjoy
This goes in every Schwarma sandwich I eat :)
 
#6
View attachment 752
Baba Ganoush / Salat Hatzelim
This recipe is for another staple of Israeli life, the smokey aubergine pate.
Variations of this divine dish can be found all over the world not just the Middle East.
  • 3 medium-sized eggplants
  • 1/2 cup tahini
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons coarse salt
  • 3 tablespoons freshly-squeezed lemon juice
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed
  • 1/8 teaspoon chile powder
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • a half bunch cilantro leaves

1. Preheat the oven to 375F (190C).

2. Prick each eggplant a few times, then char the outside of the eggplants by placing them directly on the flame of a gas burner and as the skin chars, turn them until the eggplants are uniformly-charred on the outside. (If you don’t have a gas stove, you can char them under the broiler. If not, skip to the next step.)

3. Place the eggplants on a baking sheet and roast in the oven for 20 to 30 minutes, until they’re completely soft; you should be able to easily poke a paring knife into them and meet no resistance.

4. Remove from oven and let cool.

5. Split the eggplant and scrape out the pulp. Puree the pulp in a blender or food processor with the other ingredients until smooth.

6. Taste, and season with additional salt and lemon juice, if necessary. Serve drizzled with olive oil and served with pita.
OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOoooooooooooo that sounds goooooood! I'm gonna try it. Thanks for the grub brother hehe

Chili out.
 
#8
As we are now celebrating the festival of Hanukkah I thought I would post a recipe for latkes which are a tradition Hanukkah dish.
  • 1/2 kg or 1 pound white potatoes
  • 125 g or 1/2 cup finely chopped onion
  • 1 large egg, beaten
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 to 3/4 cup oil
  • sour cream to serve
  • applesauce to serve
Method:
Peel potatoes and grate. Soak potatoes in a bowl of water for 1 to 2 minutes. Drain in a colander.
Squeeze as much water out as possible. Mix with egg and salt.

Heat oil in a nonstick skillet over medium high heat. Form 2 tablespoons potato mixture into flat patties and drop into skillet. Fry until browned, about 5 minutes on each side. Transfer to paper towels to drain. Add more oil to skillet as needed. Keep latkes warm on a wire rack set in a shallow baking pan in oven.

Serve laktes with sour cream and applesauce.

Happy Hanukkah
 
Amens/Likes: Where is the Messiah
#9
Moroccan Mint Tea
Simple recipe with an authentic taste of the Holy Land.
Boiling Water
1 Bunch fresh Mint
Black Tea 1T or 2 Tea Bags
Sugar
1 teaspoon Rose Water
Method:
Pick mint leaves and add to a large tea pot with black tea.
Top up tea pot with boiling water and steep.
Remove tea bags.
Sweeten to taste. Traditionally this drink is served very sweet.
Add rose water and serve into middle eastern tea/coffee cups.
 
Amens/Likes: Intojoy and chili
#10
Shakshuka
This is a classic dish to be eaten in a Pita with salad or served right in the frying pan. Have it for breakfast or lunch.
Ingredients:
Olive Oil
2 Cloves Garlic, minced
1 small onion, chopped
1 can crushed tomatoes
1 small chilli pepper,chopped seeds discarded (optional) or 1 tsp Harissa
2 eggs
salt and pepper
Method:
1. In a small frying pan saute the chilli garlic and onion in a nice glug of olive oil.
2. Add canned tomatoes and simmer for 5 minutes
3. Crack eggs over top
4. Season with salt and pepper
5. Cover pan and cook on medium heat until eggs are done to your liking
Serve in frying pan with pitta and Israeli Chopped Salad
 

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Amens/Likes: Lanolin and chili
#12
Shalom From Jerusalem.
I had an idea to look at the Seven Species of the Holy Land and try to create recipes from them.
Deuteronomy 8:7-8
"7 For the Lord your God is bringing you into a good land—a land with brooks, streams, and deep springs gushing out into the valleys and hills; 8 a land with wheat and barley, vines and fig trees, pomegranates, olive oil and honey; "

so we have;
1. Wheat
From Challah to Dumplings.
2. Barley
Great in Stews and Cholents which are traditional slow cooked meals eaten on Shabbat.
3. Grapes
Wine has always been produced in the Land of Israel.
4. Figs
Both fresh and dried figs with many uses in regional cuisine.
5. Olives
Preserved olives and olive oil are both staple foods in Israel
6. Honey
I will include a recipe for the best Honey Apple cake which is a perfect treat for the Jewish New Year.
7. Pomegranates
So good for you. How about a Pomegranate syrup recipe to pour on your pancakes instead of maple syrup that is full of vitamins and anti oxidants?
 
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Amens/Likes: Where is the Messiah
#13
As a chef who lives in Jerusalem I would love to share recipes if people are interested? Questions are welcome in regards to food and cooking of the Holy Land.
I was in Israel while in the Marines back in 1995-96...while there I trained with Israeli Commandos at Camp Shivta...a food truck would come out daily and bring these wonderful sandwiches, sub style sandwiches, with a spread on them that had the flavor of eggs but had a red tint..maybe from paprika...not sure...could you possibly help me with this...I have been trying now for over 20 years to recreate this spread just from flavor memory..sounds weird I know...but just not hitting the right mixtures or something...maybe I am completely off in my thinking...I also cant find anything about it online...can you please help if possible?
 
Amens/Likes: Cturtle

Fish Catcher Jim

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#14
I was in Israel while in the Marines back in 1995-96...while there I trained with Israeli Commandos at Camp Shivta...a food truck would come out daily and bring these wonderful sandwiches, sub style sandwiches, with a spread on them that had the flavor of eggs but had a red tint..maybe from paprika...not sure...could you possibly help me with this...I have been trying now for over 20 years to recreate this spread just from flavor memory..sounds weird I know...but just not hitting the right mixtures or something...maybe I am completely off in my thinking...I also cant find anything about it online...can you please help if possible?
Not sure but see if anything here fits

https://www.google.com/search?biw=3...13i30j0i8i13i30j33i21j33i22i29i30.DTHeDOJHfZs
 
Amens/Likes: Cturtle
#15
It wasnt the Sabich...it looked like an American style sub sandwich with meats, lettuce, tomato, and onion....but with a reddish/orange spread that tasted of egg...but the spread had a slight gritty texture as well...not bad or anything...just not completely smooth...Very similar to this below... 1018316866.jpg
 
#17
View attachment 752
Baba Ganoush / Salat Hatzelim
This recipe is for another staple of Israeli life, the smokey aubergine pate.
Variations of this divine dish can be found all over the world not just the Middle East.
  • 3 medium-sized eggplants
  • 1/2 cup tahini
  • 1 1/4 teaspoons coarse salt
  • 3 tablespoons freshly-squeezed lemon juice
  • 3 cloves garlic, peeled and smashed
  • 1/8 teaspoon chile powder
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • a half bunch cilantro leaves

1. Preheat the oven to 375F (190C).

2. Prick each eggplant a few times, then char the outside of the eggplants by placing them directly on the flame of a gas burner and as the skin chars, turn them until the eggplants are uniformly-charred on the outside. (If you don’t have a gas stove, you can char them under the broiler. If not, skip to the next step.)

3. Place the eggplants on a baking sheet and roast in the oven for 20 to 30 minutes, until they’re completely soft; you should be able to easily poke a paring knife into them and meet no resistance.

4. Remove from oven and let cool.

5. Split the eggplant and scrape out the pulp. Puree the pulp in a blender or food processor with the other ingredients until smooth.

6. Taste, and season with additional salt and lemon juice, if necessary. Serve drizzled with olive oil and served with pita.
Thank you for this recipe. I tried it. Everybody loves it.

Annie xxx
 
Amens/Likes: Cturtle
#18
Request for recipes...I really like challah bread although Ive only made it a few times, its not readily available in bakeries here.
Also matza crackers? I would like a recipe for that.

I've tried latkes, kind of like hash browns or potato fritters. Yum.