Reaching out to the homeless.

rtm3039

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yea no.

I don't agree with that kind of treatment. Cos it doesn't work. They just a revolving door.
I'm more into preventative strategies. Not ambulance at the bottom of the cliff.
I hear what you are saying, but solutions are not always that easy. The logic behind this is that they are still going to do the drug, so providing the clean needles just prevents further issues of having to deal with the drug and the medical issue associated with the use of contaminated needles. This approach just prevents matters from getting worse.

Providing the needles has no real impact on promoting the use of the drug, as I know no one that has ever decided to start using Heroin just because they had access to clean needles.

According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health (NSDUH), in 2016 about 948,000 Americans reported using heroin in the past year, a number that has been on the rise since 2007. No updated figures are available, but I suspect that this number is now over 1 million. If we use the previous ration of 1 in 10, that's potentially 100,000 people that can contract HIV via used needles.

From an article I just read (https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/18/opinion/pricing-hiv-drugs-america.html), the average yearly HIV cost is $39,000 and the average time people live is around 10 years. Now, you can buy 100 needles for $19.99 (https://medicalsupplies.healthcaresupplypros.com/swd513132?gclid=EAIaIQobChMIs6_rgN6p5wIVS73ACh1YPA4ZEAQYASABEgKBOfD_BwE), or around $70.00 for a year's supply. S0 spending $70.00 can avoid spending $39.000.
 

bobinfaith

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"I am also rather shocked that people are giving drug addicts CLEAN needles! And think that's helping. You should not give addicts anything to keep them going with their addictions. Its like giving alcoholics a drink from a clean glass rather than a dirty one."

This ends up being a public health issue. 1 in 10 people become infected with HIV through using dirty needles. Don't get me wring, I don't like it, but I get it.

rtm3039
Well just stop using drugs then.
I don't really have any sympathy if you going to do drugs with a needle dirty or clean.
Hello Lanolin and Ray;

I feel as Christians we can agree we wouldn't wish homelessness on anyone. Its a fact that its always existed around the world since the Old and New Testaments.

The frustration is, for example, the distribution of clean syringe needles, buprenorphine, methadone, or anti-depressants, to combat the substance abuse addictions.

Or, we're enabling addicts to continue their habit but with clean needles which seems to be the consolation for solution in the metro cities. San Francisco is a horrible example of this and though the statistics in the USA is important information, this does does not mean that the social programs have the grand solutions. They are trying but are all missing a most important ingredient.

Jesus taught in the Gospels that the poor would always be with us. In my 20 years ministering to the homeless, drug and alcohol dependency, dysfunctional families, those in prison, time and time again, prayer, spending time with "people," (not labels,) buying them a cup of coffee or lunch, and inviting them to worship at church with us, not just telling them to go to church.

We would drive to the shelters, street corners and pick up brothers and sisters, go to church and afterwards, go out to lunch and then take them back with tremendous results! Men and women came to Christ,
cleaned up (purified flesh), learned how to do a job resume and get gainfully employed, in my 20 years witnessed more success. Sure, many men and women chose to remain homeless, lost and remained inside their box and still continue praying for them today.

But we focused and encouraged the men and women who took the positive step in their lives, chose Jesus over drugs, God Almighty's provisions, feeling like a contributor instead of a liability to our society, most ended up following Jesus and are serving Him in the church today.

If we are going to reach out to the homeless, one at a time, then nothing beats
live testimony, loving and treating these men and women as human beings in alignment with the Gospels.
 
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rtm3039

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Hello Lanolin and Ray;

I feel as Christians we can agree we wouldn't wish homelessness on anyone. Its a fact that its always existed around the world since the Old and New Testaments.

The frustration is, for example, the distribution of clean syringe needles, buprenorphine, methadone, or anti-depressants, to combat the substance abuse addictions.

Or, we're enabling addicts to continue their habit but with clean needles which seems to be the consolation for solution in the metro cities. San Francisco is a horrible example of this and though the statistics in the USA is important information, this does does not mean that the social programs have the grand solutions. They are trying but are all missing a most important ingredient.

Jesus taught in the Gospels that the poor would always be with us. In my 20 years ministering to the homeless, drug and alcohol dependency, dysfunctional families, those in prison, time and time again, prayer, spending time with "people," (not labels,) buying them a cup of coffee or lunch, and inviting them to worship at church with us, not just telling them to go to church.

We would drive to the shelters, street corners and pick up brothers and sisters, go to church and afterwards, go out to lunch and then take them back with tremendous results! Men and women came to Christ,
cleaned up (purified flesh), learned how to do a job resume and get gainfully employed, in my 20 years witnessed more success. Sure, many men and women chose to remain homeless, lost and remained inside their box and still continue praying for them today.

But we focused and encouraged the men and women who took the positive step in their lives, chose Jesus over drugs, God Almighty's provisions, feeling like a contributor instead of a liability to our society, most ended up following Jesus and are serving Him in the church today.

If we are going to reach out to the homeless, one at a time, then nothing beats
live testimony, loving and treating these men and women as human beings in alignment with the Gospels.
I could only find data from 2012, but it appears there are many areas involved in this program:

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I think it's one on one if you are going to be reaching out to anyone who is homeless.

For anyone without a home, to be invited into one is a God send. Jesus spent a lot of time homeless in his ministry.

He actually wasn't allowed to go into his own Father's house (the temple).

In the paper today the front page had about 'ghost homes' that could be used to house the homeless or low-income earners, at least temporaririly, they are mostly richer people's holiday homes sitting round unoccupied or richer people's second (or third, or fourth) investment sitting round waiting to be demolished for development.
 
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I've been reading about domestic violence.

Probably one of the main reasons youth are homeless, because they are running away from violent broken homes. And of course, most cannot afford to stay anywhere, and they have no jobs.

It makes me a bit angry that Francine Rivers can just gliby say homeless are lazy or they just don't want to spend money on housing. Um maybe they actually HAVE NO MONEY. Most are just surviving day to day, couch surfing or living in cars. They can't go back 'home' cos at home they will be abused or even killed. It might have not occured to her that many homeless are runaways.
 

rtm3039

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I've been reading about domestic violence.

Probably one of the main reasons youth are homeless, because they are running away from violent broken homes. And of course, most cannot afford to stay anywhere, and they have no jobs.

It makes me a bit angry that Francine Rivers can just gliby say homeless are lazy or they just don't want to spend money on housing. Um maybe they actually HAVE NO MONEY. Most are just surviving day to day, couch surfing or living in cars. They can't go back 'home' cos at home they will be abused or even killed. It might have not occured to her that many homeless are runaways.
Good day Lanolin, I suspect that domestic violence might be an issue; however, probably not the "main reason." I guess I would need to know what you mean by "youth." In the US, we do have a serious problem with homeless children, but this usually extends to their families as well.

As for Francine Rivers, this might be a case of misquoting. If you are citing her January 21, 2020 piece “Searching for Solutions to Homelessness,” the comments she made were actually attributable to some of the people she asked about the issue of homelessness. https://francinerivers.com/searching-for-solutions-to-homelessness/. Also, she is from California, which has a unique homeless problem "“Almost half (47 percent) of all unsheltered homeless people in the United States are found in California, about four times as high as their share of the overall United States population. Among the five cities with the highest rates of unsheltered homelessness, four are in California (San Francisco, Los Angeles, Santa Rosa, and San Jose), and the other is Seattle.”


(see: https://blog.acton.org/archives/111777-10-facts-about-homelessness-in-america.html?utm_term=causes of homelessness&utm_campaign=5+Facts+-+Educational+Evergreen&utm_source=adwords&utm_medium=ppc&hsa_acc=9098040689&hsa_cam=6526563754&hsa_grp=85326033024&hsa_ad=384418036927&hsa_src=g&hsa_tgt=kwd-296699658883&hsa_kw=causes of homelessness&hsa_mt=b&hsa_net=adwords&hsa_ver=3&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIzoSywuiy5wIVmZOzCh0XMA9wEAAYASAAEgLwJfD_BwE)
 
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Here in the U.S. minors run away from the places they reside for a variety of reasons. Rebellious youth here usually do so to escape the grips of parental control. My eldest ran away so many times, the police would just call to say they saw her. Sometimes they would take her to the youth shelter, and she would walk in one door then out the other. Unless you are a parent that has experienced this behavior, you don't realize the extreme magnitude of the problem. Internet technology has made matters worse today as many runaways think they have someplace "safe" to go. Its something few discuss, because of the dangers their children have voluntarily placed themselves into (being "homeless" and living on the streets). Predators are waiting with every evil thought imaginable.
 

rtm3039

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Here in the U.S. minors run away from the places they reside for a variety of reasons. Rebellious youth here usually do so to escape the grips of parental control. My eldest ran away so many times, the police would just call to say they saw her. Sometimes they would take her to the youth shelter, and she would walk in one door then out the other. Unless you are a parent that has experienced this behavior, you don't realize the extreme magnitude of the problem. Internet technology has made matters worse today as many runaways think they have someplace "safe" to go. Its something few discuss, because of the dangers their children have voluntarily placed themselves into (being "homeless" and living on the streets). Predators are waiting with every evil thought imaginable.
We have five kids (now adults). None ever ran away, even though the wife and I tried real hard to get them to do so :) My sister, on the other hand, ran away at 14 to California. She tried to cross into Mexico (sight seeing), got caught, and brought back to Miami. As soon as the dust settled, she did it again and she has been in California ever since (40 plus years).
 

rtm3039

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Here in the U.S. minors run away from the places they reside for a variety of reasons. Rebellious youth here usually do so to escape the grips of parental control. My eldest ran away so many times, the police would just call to say they saw her. Sometimes they would take her to the youth shelter, and she would walk in one door then out the other. Unless you are a parent that has experienced this behavior, you don't realize the extreme magnitude of the problem. Internet technology has made matters worse today as many runaways think they have someplace "safe" to go. Its something few discuss, because of the dangers their children have voluntarily placed themselves into (being "homeless" and living on the streets). Predators are waiting with every evil thought imaginable.
thenami, getting back to the children thing. It is very hard to predict these things. Yes, there are the obvious ones that come from homes and parents that really should have never had children. Then there are some who appear to focused on destroying their lives (or at least making it as hard as possible), regardless of their home environment.

Working for the school system allows me to see the full range. I have seen an eight y/o addicted to porn and a 16 y/o that goes to school all day then has a night job to help support his mother.

Same in my household. All of our kids were raised the same way an in the same environment. Out of the five, one of them (middle daughter) did everything she could to ruin her life. Imagine growing up with a flat screen TV in your bedroom and only having to walk 50 yards to a swimming pool. Nope, she thought her environment was a bit too privileged, so she started looking for friends in one of the more messed up high schools in the county. Ends up that she graduates high school, moves in with her "bad boy" friend, gets pregnant, he gets deported, and she ends up back to her flat screen TV, but has to spend her off time raising a son. That was 12 years ago and she has recovered. The little boy is my oldest grandson, so I have a hard time not appreciating his birth (regardless of the circumstances).

Forrest Gump was totally right; life is a box of chocolates.
 
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It doesn't matter what we want for our children, nor how we decide to raise them. They are people with minds, and hearts of their own. Everything they do in their lives is a personal choice. We can lead them as to which way to go, and teach them the life skills they need to succeed. That is our duty as parents. Where they go on the other hand, is not up to us no matter how much some believe other wise. We only have control over ourselves. Expectations are for us, not others.

Life really is a box of chocolates.
 
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I don't think you can force a child to stay home but they do know in their hearts when they are not wanted or loved for just who they are (not what the parents want them to be). Things might be pretty bad for them to run away, but many do so out of fear.

You might think your brand of discipline is correct and 'for their good' but you can end up pushing them away.
You might even think your permissiveness is ok but then the child knows that without any safe boundaries they don't know security in their own homes. And they will run somewhere they think is SAFER. Its not so much roof over their head they value, it to be loved uncondiitonally.

Everyone is seeking that. On the streets, there aren't many conditions that you need to meet.

It breaks my heart to hear some parents joke that they want their child to move out. Even if the child is not within earshot, they know they are only just tolerated. Now even when children grow up and become adults, that parent - child bond or lack of it will affect their entire lives. If it is backwards and wrong..if the hearts of the Fathers are not toward their children and the children not toward their fathers, you have this dysfunction and homelessness.