Safe in my garden

#22
I need to get me some pinestraw.
Off to feed my worms...did I tell you I became a farmer...have my own worm farm now.

But then I was reading this book about human manure used for composting. I dont know how we came to flushing all our manure into the sea but I suppose we can thank the Romans for that? In the Bible I think the Israelites just buried it.
 
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Cturtle

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#23
I need to get me some pinestraw.
Off to feed my worms...did I tell you I became a farmer...have my own worm farm now.

But then I was reading this book about human manure used for composting. I dont know how we came to flushing all our manure into the sea but I suppose we can thank the Romans for that? In the Bible I think the Israelites just buried it.
Congratulations on your worm farm. I have seen many people who have used table scraps and waste for their worm farm, one was a family that lives in a bus in New Zealand. It seems like a good process. Interesting to learn about for sure.
 
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#25
Ive not seen a witchhazel I dont think it grows in my area as we dont get snow.
Other cool plants that we cant really grow here - tulips, paeonies, lilac and wintersweet.


But we can grow sub tropical plants like bananas, hibiscus and gardenias. Am very blessed that in Auckland we have a year round growing season, but the downside is the weeds like to grow year round too!
 
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#27
Lanolin - We have a "country" quote here in the US that, "weeds are plants that have not learned to grow in straight rows." :LOL:.....:).....:D
Haha
Weeds are just plants in the wrong place. Thats what everyone says. However I dispute that because perfectly good plants sometimes just need to be moved to the right place to flourish. But the place for actual weeds is either in the compost bin or to be burned.
 
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Fish Catcher Jim

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#28
Definition of a weed
Anything you don't want growing

That's what I was told when I was a kid by the gentlemen who had the best looking yard and flowers in town.

It just stuck with me.
Blessings to you
 
Nov 21, 2016
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#30
Hey guys,

My latest project is re-pointing the wall in my garden. I have a small courtyard garden and the back wall is falling to pieces. If I don't take action, there will be no garden/shared garden with a dodgy neighbour lol. So I'm waiting for the good weather (in the UK) to fix my wall. But in the meantime I made an impulse purchase of a little olive tree. It's sitting there in it's little pot, waiting... It's full of tiny buds, and I know it wants to be planted in the ground. But not until the wall is fixed. I have Jasmine that's years old, and is growing up another flint wall, it looks gorgeous and smells divine in the Summer, and it's next to an Alder bush that has grown and now acts as an umbrella in the Summer, to sit underneath. I can't wait to get out there and start fixin!!! Just praying for the weather(y)

Blessings

Annie x

(My kitchen has a big bag of sand and a big bag of cement in it, so all the more reason to crack on!!!)
 
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Cturtle

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#31
Hey guys,

My latest project is re-pointing the wall in my garden. I have a small courtyard garden and the back wall is falling to pieces. If I don't take action, there will be no garden/shared garden with a dodgy neighbour lol. So I'm waiting for the good weather (in the UK) to fix my wall. But in the meantime I made an impulse purchase of a little olive tree. It's sitting there in it's little pot, waiting... It's full of tiny buds, and I know it wants to be planted in the ground. But not until the wall is fixed. I have Jasmine that's years old, and is growing up another flint wall, it looks gorgeous and smells divine in the Summer, and it's next to an Alder bush that has grown and now acts as an umbrella in the Summer, to sit underneath. I can't wait to get out there and start fixin!!! Just praying for the weather(y)

Blessings

Annie x

(My kitchen has a big bag of sand and a big bag of cement in it, so all the more reason to crack on!!!)
Excited to see the pictures :)
Joining prayers for good weather
 
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#32
I'd like to show you my garden...but I don't have any pictures yet.
However, you all invited to read what I've been up to in my rambling garden diary blog.
I started this garden recently after studying horticulture for a bit and NOW I sort of know how to do it.

http://ramblinggarden.blogspot.co.nz

I'm wondering if you have a garden what kind of special features have you put in..? To make it your safe quiet place?
Lanolin:

You are in Aotearoa..I used to live there in Levin…we have a lemon bush and a small garden with an enclosed compost heap in the corner..
Grew the largest lettuce I’ve seen anywhere outside NZ. We also had a grape arbor that was at the entrance to the garden….

APAK
 
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#33
Mum doesnt like creeping plants...she thinks they are creepy.

At first I thought she was a bit nuts because they look so pretty. I would love to have ivy covered walls on our brick house, but mum says no. Yesterday she got me to cut back a native creeping plant called muehlenbeckia complexa. I planted it in the corner of he deck and it had grown to cover a fence and side of the rail of the deck. But the thing with this plant is it twines around everything every which way and creeps along the ground, it was coming up everywhere because of its divaricating habit.

I was reluctant to obey at first but knew she had a point. If I let it go on growing it would take over. it can go for metres. So out comes the secateurs. I cut and cut and pulled it out by the roots. It was growing near my manuka and had tried to grow up it by twining up the trunks and branches to the point of near strangling it.

I was horrified because by twisting up the manuka it had left marks on it becuse the manuka was young snd growing too but the muhlenbeckia though weaker stemmed had twisted around it so much it was cutting off the circulation of one branch in an attempt to reach the light.

Well I thought God was saying something to me here. The plant really was a sneaky creeper, almost like a snake. It didnt have branches of its on or growing upright so it just latched on to another nearby. It had to go so I cut and unloosed every twisted tendril from the poor manuka so it could be free.
 
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Cturtle

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#34
Well I thought God was saying something to me here. The plant really was a sneaky creeper, almost like a snake. It didnt have branches of its on or growing upright so it just latched on to another nearby. It had to go so I cut and unloosed every twisted tendril from the poor manuka so it could be free.
Reminds me of how the enemy is. He gets a little way in, and if we don't cast down or deny his ways right and authority to grow in our lives... they will choke out the light, and intertwine so much, that we will loose track of where we are supposed to be and what the truth of the Word is. God's Word is the double edged sword that cuts back the enemies ugly ways and keeps us growing healthy. If we choose to pattern our lives after it and allow it to do the pruning :)

Good points you made
 
#35
It was the spirt of the python.
I got quite mad at it, God was showing me theres this one person that I knew who tried to lean on me for everything and slowly started to choke me. This person was also giving out false personal prophecies like a fortuneteller would in hopes of ingratiating themselves to people. I wondered why this was so because they gave every appearance of being christian, but their testimony didnt ring true.

Like this plant, it was sold at the garden centre so I assumed it would be ok to plant, its not a weed right? There was no warning on the label that it would do this. I learned there are different types of muhelnbeckia, and this one I had was the nasty one.
I have seen this plant cover several metres of wall where it looks great covering the side of a huge concrete motorway ramp. Thats where it should be planted, or over a steep bank, with no other plants nearby.
 
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bobinfaith

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#36
Muehlenbeckia complexa was a problem here many years ago at a couple of tourist parks in San Francisco, the Presidio and Golden Gate National Recreation Area and was on the news. Is this plant an attractive plant that can be deceiving and choke other "good" plants?

Another time I was raking and trimming the yard one Saturday and my wife asked me not to pull up the "pretty flowers." I didn't like them because they were yellow, green and orange but she really liked how they blended with her roses and dandy lions, so I let them alone.

But our neighbor told my wife that they should be pulled because they're "american weeds." I have heard that expression before from friends in South Carolina, Georgia, up and down the Californias, Arizona and now my neighbor.

I don't know why they're called "american weeds" but was told because these are native weeds in this country. They looked pretty but are known to choke the flowers and good plants.

So my wife asked me to plant baby potato stems and later was going to add them when I made soup, or make french fries. It was neat to see them sprout until one day the raccoons came out at night and ate them.
 
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#37
When I read american gardening books they always talk about 'deer proof' or 'deer resistant' plants. Are there deer wandering all over the place eating all your plants?

Over here we have problems with possums, rabbits, and pukekos.

Snails can handle and not usually a problem, as well as caterpillars because if you encourage birds they will eat them.
 

Pastor Gary

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#38
Lanolin - there are 5 species of 'deer' on the North American Continent (US, Canada and Mexico) with nearly 100 sub species found around the world. In the US, the White Tail Deer is the most common with the Mule Deer coming in second. However, the deer family also includes Elk and Moose. The estimated White Tail Deer population alone in the US is approximately 30 million. Males can weigh up to 280 pounds (130 kg) and females can weigh up to 200 pounds (92 kg). Just as a side note, a male Moose can weigh up to 1550 pounds (700kg) and stands over 7 feet tall. As the urban human population pushes outward, the deer habitat is taken over by expanding residential areas and businesses, forcing deer to retreat. However, a person's garden makes a good 'meal' for deer and the availability of garden veggies is tempting for them. With that many deer in the US, there are numerous vehicle collisions with deer each year. This causes extensive damage and usually causes the deer's death. Also, if a large semi truck hits a Moose, the resulting damage to the truck can cost upwards of $30,000 US dollars to repair, not to mention the potential injuries to the driver. A passenger vehicle hitting a moose at highway speed almost always involves injuries or deaths to the vehicle occupants.

I live in a community of approximately 100,000 people - and I have seen deer in my neighborhood right in the city. They can be destructive to gardens and agricultural areas, and with less and less deer being harvested by hunters each year during hunting season, the problems with deer interacting with humans will be increasing. Hunting has been a tradition in the US for well over 400 years and with the attitudes of some politically motivated, anti firearms persons to shame hunters into staying out of the hunting areas, the deer population is not being harvested and their numbers in many areas are increasing dramatically.

Persons in rural areas are most affected by garden robbing deer, but many persons in cities and towns can also see their gardens ransacked.
 
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#39
Wow didnt know it was a huge problem. We do have deer in nz but only in the wild and they are allowed to be hunted, in fact, the govt paid people to hunt them. Plus their meat and antlers are used, however, I have never eaten venison, its not commonly available.

Possums the govt tried to get rid of by using 1080 poison, but many envrionmentalists are against that, because of risk to other wildlife, many people use traps or shoot them. But you can use them for their fur which is very soft. The possums tend to live around bush areas I've not seen any where I live in the suburbs.

Whoever introduced rabbits though, might have to atone for it especially in australia where they decimate crops. So they built a rabbit proof fence. The problem seems to be they multiply and eat everyones lettuces and carrots. But again I've never had a problem with them, possibly because in my garden I do not grow lettuce, so when I did see a bunny it just ate my weeds.

Pukekos are native to nz again I've never had any problem with them, but other people report they can destroy a garden. My big problem was chickens, but as long as you feed them correctly they dont go messing round your garden. Seedlings are vulnerable but you need to take some losses.
 
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