Ten Commandments?

Apr 11, 2014
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I like MercyMe 's "Ten Simple Rules" song.
And Lord said,
"Have no other gods but God;
To worship idols just won't do.
Be careful with the way you use God's name,
And keep Sunday special too.
Honor your parents, don't take any lives.
And when you're old enough to marry, be true.
Do not steal or lie
Or want those things that don't belong to you."
These are ten simple rules God gave to me and you
 
Feb 2, 2014
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Okay, 1st, I like the KJV. I feel it brings extra meaning that can be lost in other translations. Yet, one has to consider that those who translated the KJV did it for a king, a king that if he was not happy with the translation may have lopped of your head.

Now read so called commandment 1 and 2 and does it not mean 1 in the same? (Of course with all due respect)
No translation can be 100% accurate because as with any communication it must be looked at in the context of the writer's culture. I do not believe for a moment the translators of the KJV were intimidated or feared the king of England. If anyone ever bothered to read how the translation occurred, you'd never read another version. The power of the KJV is that it wasn't translated by one person or even one group. They were the absolute very best in their linguistic field. Once a part was translated another group translated the same part. Then they compared. When a difference was shown they'd ask a third group. Finally when all the groups could not agree, they'd send a request to all the churches in the UK asking for their prayerful thoughts. The majority won out. Did that ensure 100% accuracy? Not at all, but it also involved the Church not just eggheads with a stack of diplomas.

Remember, with Hebrew and Greek, there are not punctuations!

With that said, I stand with the translation. Where would you separate the Ten Words?

Here's how the Jews separate it, notice the first comment at the top of the article:

http://www.myjewishlearning.com/holidays/Jewish_Holidays/Shavuot/In_the_Community/Torah_Reading_and_Haftarah/The_Ten_Commandments.shtml
 
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Feb 2, 2014
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I like MercyMe 's "Ten Simple Rules" song.
And Lord said,
"Have no other gods but God;
To worship idols just won't do.
Be careful with the way you use God's name,
And keep Sunday special too.
Honor your parents, don't take any lives.
And when you're old enough to marry, be true.
Do not steal or lie
Or want those things that don't belong to you."
These are ten simple rules God gave to me and you
Nice, but "Sunday" isn't the Sabbath...except as defined by certain denoms...
 
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Jul 22, 2010
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Not sure how ::
Exo 20:1 And God spoke all these words, saying,
Exo 20:2 "I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery.
can be said to be a commandment.
OK as a good law abiding Jew, what am I supposed to do or not do?:confused:
 
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Sep 3, 2009
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No translation can be 100% accurate because as with any communication it must be looked at in the context of the writer's culture. I do not believe for a moment the translators of the KJV were intimidated or feared the king of England. If anyone ever bothered to read how the translation occurred, you'd never read another version. The power of the KJV is that it wasn't translated by one person or even one group. They were the absolute very best in their linguistic field. Once a part was translated another group translated the same part. Then they compared. When a difference was shown they'd ask a third group. Finally when all the groups could not agree, they'd send a request to all the churches in the UK asking for their prayerful thoughts. The majority won out. Did that ensure 100% accuracy? Not at all, but it also involved the Church not just eggheads with a stack of diplomas.

Remember, with Hebrew and Greek, there are not punctuations!

With that said, I stand with the translation. Where would you separate the Ten Words?

Here's how the Jews separate it, notice the first comment at the top of the article:

http://www.myjewishlearning.com/holidays/Jewish_Holidays/Shavuot/In_the_Community/Torah_Reading_and_Haftarah/The_Ten_Commandments.shtml
AND the KJ is the only translation that is not copy write protected!
 
Jul 22, 2014
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Okay, 1st, I like the KJV. I feel it brings extra meaning that can be lost in other translations. Yet, one has to consider that those who translated the KJV did it for a king, a king that if he was not happy with the translation may have lopped of your head.

Now read so called commandment 1 and 2 and does it not mean 1 in the same? (Of course with all due respect)
Some of my Protestant cousins ... well I think they are Protestants. They attend church in a cathedral, something like Grand Central Station, and the wall shake when they sing hymns, but they don't claim to belong to any particular Christian group.

Anyway they say that the Ten Commandments began as civil code. No other gods is a call for a single judge. No graven image is a call for fair consideration of the evidence.

When I was here last night, I had meant to say one more thing, but Mom gave me a chore. Life has its priorities.

Anyway, I had meant to say that our parish priests are fond of saying there is only one commandment: Love God and your neighbor.
 
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Oct 8, 2013
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I'm no linguist, but it wouldn't surprise me if this word was coined to describe what the Bible was pointing out. It doesn't seem man-made to me.
I guess perhaps I'm splitting hairs and grasping at the wind. I just see so very, very much dis-information out there that I'm paranoid as to what is truth. Thankfully, God Almighty seems to have shown me discernment to some extent.

At this point, I'll chock it up to some things were meant for a certain understanding to one group of believers, while another slightly different slant was meant to mean(Bless) another distinct body of believers.
 
Oct 8, 2013
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No translation can be 100% accurate because as with any communication it must be looked at in the context of the writer's culture. I do not believe for a moment the translators of the KJV were intimidated or feared the king of England. If anyone ever bothered to read how the translation occurred, you'd never read another version. The power of the KJV is that it wasn't translated by one person or even one group. They were the absolute very best in their linguistic field. Once a part was translated another group translated the same part. Then they compared. When a difference was shown they'd ask a third group. Finally when all the groups could not agree, they'd send a request to all the churches in the UK asking for their prayerful thoughts. The majority won out. Did that ensure 100% accuracy? Not at all, but it also involved the Church not just eggheads with a stack of diplomas.

Remember, with Hebrew and Greek, there are not punctuations!

With that said, I stand with the translation. Where would you separate the Ten Words?

Here's how the Jews separate it, notice the first comment at the top of the article:

http://www.myjewishlearning.com/holidays/Jewish_Holidays/Shavuot/In_the_Community/Torah_Reading_and_Haftarah/The_Ten_Commandments.shtml
Yes, I agree with you, there are multiple reasons why a translation could have difficulties conveying the original meaning.

That's why I wish I would be able to read the original text. I had studied biblical Hebrew some, perhaps I'll endeavor to get back into it.

I, myself, would say the first 'Words of God' would be the statement - I Am the Lord your God Who brought you out of the land of Egypt (paraphrased).

Then I would say what is considered by most translations that the second commandment, 'Words of God', is explaining or going into more detail of the first - Second Commandment (Exodus 20:3-6): You shall have no other gods beside Me. You shall not make for yourself any graven image, nor any manner of likeness, of any thing that is heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth. You shall not bow down to them, nor serve them, for I, the Lord Your God, am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers upon the children unto the third and fourth generation. (copy/paste from - http://www.myjewishlearning.com/holidays/Jewish_Holidays/Shavuot/In_the_Community/Torah_Reading_and_Haftarah/The_Ten_Commandments.shtml).

As far as the KJV, please don't get me wrong, with all due respect, I like the KJV. Since I wan't around during that time, nor was I able to witness it being done, I can't put forth any factual information as to the conditions it was done.

I do appreciate the information you posted about how it was done, thank you.
 
Oct 8, 2013
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Not sure how ::
Exo 20:1 And God spoke all these words, saying,
Exo 20:2 "I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery.
can be said to be a commandment.
OK as a good law abiding Jew, what am I supposed to do or not do?:confused:
See, that's where the word commandment doesn't apply, but 'Words of God'. So the first, so called commandment, would be simply a statement.
 
Feb 2, 2014
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See, that's where the word commandment doesn't apply, but 'Words of God'. So the first, so called commandment, would be simply a statement.
Commandment: A command; an edict.
Command: To direct with authority; give orders to.

Word: A sound or a combination of sounds, or its representation in writing or printing, that symbolizes and communicates a meaning.

This same misunderstanding of the word commandment is used when we hear the word Law. In Hebrew commandment is just word and Law is actually teaching. This is how the Lord Jesus was able to fulfill the Law, while not doing away with it: it's a teaching. This is how the first "commandment" is a teaching not a law while at the same time be a law of reality: i.e. God Exists.

How apt is His Name today when people don't believe He Exists.
 
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Jul 22, 2010
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Mark 12:29. Jesus answered, "The most important is, 'Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one.
Mark 12:30. And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.'
Mark 12:31. The second is this: 'You shall love your neighbor as yourself.' There is no other commandment greater than these."
Could we be looking at the word 'commandment' the wrong way? What we (I) would tend to pass off as an introductory statement, Jesus calls or includes as a commandment. ie. we are commanded to believe, 'Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one.'
So then we also are commanded to believe :
Exo 20:2. "I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery."
So whilst it is an introductory statement, we are commanded to believe it.
You know dUmPsTeR, this is a really interesting point you have raised.
 
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Oct 8, 2013
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Commandment: A command; an edict.
Command: To direct with authority; give orders to.

Word: A sound or a combination of sounds, or its representation in writing or printing, that symbolizes and communicates a meaning.

This same misunderstanding of the word commandment is used when we hear the word Law. In Hebrew commandment is just word and Law is actually teaching. This is how the Lord Jesus was able to fulfill the Law, while not doing away with it: it's a teaching. This is how the first "commandment" is a teaching not a law while at the same time be a law of reality: i.e. God Exists.

How apt is His Name today when people don't believe He Exists.
Yes, and yes. For some time I have known that Law meant Teaching. Good point. And how I think about that scripture that says Jesus fulfilled the law is that He filled up the teaching.

I appreciate your contributions and patience with me.
 
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Mark 12:29. Jesus answered, "The most important is, 'Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one.
Mark 12:30. And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.'
Mark 12:31. The second is this: 'You shall love your neighbor as yourself.' There is no other commandment greater than these."
Could we be looking at the word 'commandment' the wrong way? What we (I) would tend to pass off as an introductory statement, Jesus calls or includes as a commandment. ie. we are commanded to believe, 'Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one.'
So then we also are commanded to believe :
Exo 20:2. "I am the LORD your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of slavery."
So whilst it is an introductory statement, we are commanded to believe it.
You know dUmPsTeR, this is a really interesting point you have raised.
Or like His words are to open our ears and stir our spirits like how some scripture repeats itself within the same verse bringing to it the need for heed of particular attention.

I also like how you reference Mark. It brings more to my understanding.

Thank you Calvin, thank you for your time and attention.
 
May 31, 2014
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Which Ten Commandments?

First Tables of Stone (Exodus 20)
("which Moses didst break")


Second Tables of Stone (Exodus 34)
("the words that were on the first")


1. I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. You shall have no other gods before me.



1. Thou shalt worship no other god (For the Lord is a jealous god).


2. You shall not make for yourself a graven image. You shall not bow down to them or serve them.



2. Thou shalt make thee no molten gods.


3. You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain.



3. The feast of unleavened bread shalt thou keep in the month when the ear is on the corn.


4. Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy.



4. All the first-born are mine.


5. Honor your father and your mother.



5. Six days shalt thou work, but on the seventh thou shalt rest.


6. You shall not kill.



6. Thou shalt observe the feast of weeks, even of the first fruits of the wheat harvest, and the feast of ingathering at the year's end.


7. You shall not commit adultery.



7. Thou shalt not offer the blood of my sacrifice with leavened bread.


8. You shall not steal.



8. The fat of my feast shall not remain all night until the morning.


9. You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.



9. The first of the first fruits of thy ground thou shalt bring unto the house of the Lord thy God.


10. You shall not covet.



10. Thou shalt not seethe a kid in its mother's milk.
 
Jul 22, 2014
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I would take it as such, why?
Theologoumatic me had a thought that at that time ...

Before I finish that thought, I think that the rules differed then from now, or the number of rules differed. Adam and Eve must have had at least two rules: Obey God (If I said this to a priest he likely would stop me and say the Obey God or Love God is the only rule even now.) and a second rule, which was: Don't eat the fruit.

The second rule likely no longer applies. That jinn has jumped from the jar.

An infered rule must say that the rules and the number of rules can change depending on the circumstances.
 
Jul 22, 2014
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No translation can be 100% accurate because as with any communication it must be looked at in the context of the writer's culture. I do not believe for a moment the translators of the KJV were intimidated or feared the king of England. If anyone ever bothered to read how the translation occurred, you'd never read another version. The power of the KJV is that it wasn't translated by one person or even one group. They were the absolute very best in their linguistic field. Once a part was translated another group translated the same part. Then they compared. When a difference was shown they'd ask a third group. Finally when all the groups could not agree, they'd send a request to all the churches in the UK asking for their prayerful thoughts. The majority won out. Did that ensure 100% accuracy? Not at all, but it also involved the Church not just eggheads with a stack of diplomas.

Remember, with Hebrew and Greek, there are not punctuations!

With that said, I stand with the translation. Where would you separate the Ten Words?

Here's how the Jews separate it, notice the first comment at the top of the article:

http://www.myjewishlearning.com/holidays/Jewish_Holidays/Shavuot/In_the_Community/Torah_Reading_and_Haftarah/The_Ten_Commandments.shtml
A book, God's Secretaries: The Making of the King James Bible by Adam Nicolson

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