Lanolin's Library

Via dolarossa

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Recent additions to my library to my wife's dismay. All thrift store purchases


The Zondervan Parallel New Testament in Greek and English (An interlinear Greek-English New Testament, with KJV, NIV side by side - The Greek text is Nestle's 21st Edition)

Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament by Bruce Metzger (1971 edition)

Art of Basic Drawing (Walter Foster Publishing 2005)

Jewelry Fundamentals of Metalsmithing

Wiring Complete Home Projects
(6th edition)


I have diverse interests that keep me busy.
you seem to be a man of many talents.
 
I'm reading Shepherd, A memoir by Richard Gilbert.

It's about a guy who gives buys a farm and decides he wants to be a shepherd. He's actually an academic. But he and his wife decide to give farming a go and give up their middle-class existence in town and move their two children to the Apachalians and sink huge amounts of money into their dream of the good life.
 

CPerkins

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I'm reading Shepherd, A memoir by Richard Gilbert.

It's about a guy who gives buys a farm and decides he wants to be a shepherd. He's actually an academic. But he and his wife decide to give farming a go and give up their middle-class existence in town and move their two children to the Apachalians and sink huge amounts of money into their dream of the good life.

Interesting, I'll keep my eye out for this book.

cp
 
Interesting, I'll keep my eye out for this book.

cp
I finished reading it. It was ok. I learned some things...like there are hairless sheep. This guy raised ones called Katadhins that don't have any wool cos he couldn't actually be bothered shearing. I'm like...but then why bother raising them?

I think I'll find a book actually written by a REAL shepherd because I didn't think much of his shepherding skills. At first he picked out sheep cos of their looks but then found out the prettiest and heaviest ones were really bad mothers.

However, the grazing way of raising them is pretty good, it works in NZ. You spend most the time moving fences around though, or mustering. Rather than feeding them hay in a barn. But this works only if you've got a fair amount of land.
 
Some new books I've obtained...

The Knowledge of the Holy by AW Tozer
Renewed Day by Day Daily devotional readings AW Tozer
Amazing Love by Corrie Ten Boom
Love without Limits A remarkable Story of True Love Conquering ALL by Nick Vujicic
Growing Great Boys 100s of practical strategies for bringing out the best in your son by Ian Grant
Foxe's Book of Martyrs by John Foxe
Sacred Marriage by Gary Thomas
God's Secret Plan Experiences and lessons in Multi-cultural Christian Ministry

Got a magazine -
The Holy Land - National Geographic

in middle of reading 2 Quaker Quicks books
Quakers do what! Why? by Rhiannon Grant
Practical Mystics Quaker Faith in Action by Jennifer Kavanagh - both of these are from the Friends meeting library.

Anybody interested in these or already read them?
 

Pastor Gary

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Note for Lanolin - Have you ever seen the 1934 children's story book called "Little Fat Gretchen" written by Emma L. Brock?

It is a wonderful children's story about a little wooden figure on a German music box and her little baby doll "Puppchen" in a little pram (buggy).

A brief synopsis can be found below from someone who has a copy of the book, as extracted from an open source review on line -

This is a sweet, most wonderful book, published in 1934. My mom's name is Gretchen and she had the book as a little girl, which she saved (and still has, 80+ years later). I grew up reading it, so it's very near and dear to my heart. Little fat Gretchen is a wooden figure on top of a German music box who has a baby doll--her "puppchen"--in a little buggy. One day Gretchen wakes up to find her doll and buggy have disappeared! She climbs down off the music box and ventures into the Black Forest to find her "puppchen". There she encounters various animals--a nightingale, a hare, a snail, a bee, and so on. Emma Brock's illustrations are magical, richly textured woodcuts: ferns, rocks with lichen, rivulets flowing over stones, pine needles and cones, tree bark, woodland flowers. The written music for the music-box lullaby Gretchen sings to her baby doll appears on a few pages, so when reading the book to a little one, the lullaby can also be sung.
 
Note for Lanolin - Have you ever seen the 1934 children's story book called "Little Fat Gretchen" written by Emma L. Brock?

It is a wonderful children's story about a little wooden figure on a German music box and her little baby doll "Puppchen" in a little pram (buggy).

A brief synopsis can be found below from someone who has a copy of the book, as extracted from an open source review on line -
No I've never seen that book. We don't have many childrens books from that far back unless they are classic fairy tales in the school library. The German tales we do have are Brother's Grimm. We don't have any German children at school and not many live round here though I have a few German friends who might have heard or read that story.

The tale reminds me of similar stories like Victoria Plum or Enid Blyton books. Often about toys coming to life and adventures in 'the woods'.
 
I am nearly done but struggling a bit to finish it. I am a bit annoyed with the writing style.
The author constantly writes 'we' and then constantly speculates about Paul's life when he doesn't have any evidence aside from scripture about what happened. It seems like more of a commentary on the Book of Acts and his letters than the detailed biography I was expecting.

My first impression about his writing about the Damascus road moment when Paul falls off his horse is that it falls totally flat! Why not retell it in such a way that you feel as if you are there with Paul?. He doesn't even mention how Paul was blinded by the light or the words Jesus said to him that stopped him in his tracks. Or what he was doing on Straight Street.

Instead NT Wright waffles and speculates that Paul's vision was all in his head. What, no God encounter?
The back cover states that Paul is the 'greatest public intellectual of all time.' As if theology was all he had.

What.

I thought he was the first apostle to the Gentiles. A missionary. An evangelist. A christian. A man of great faith. Not a 'public intellectual'.

Does this mean those who are evengelical christians should be known as 'public intellectuals'??
I'm getting some insights out of it but it seems a very particular view of Paul that doesn't seem to tie in with the complex yet totally converted man he becomes in the Bible. This was a guy who Jesus said would SUFFER for Jesus sake. Acts 9:16
In NT Wrights retelling, it just seems like he skims over that suffering to present a travelogue of petty early church theological squabbles.
 
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