Lanolin's Library

Nov 21, 2016
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I've always been an avid reader, and my son bought me a kindle last Christmas. Didn't think I'd get on with it coz I'm old and just like the whole feel of real books. But I have! I cleared out the living room and donated all my books (well, almost all) to a local charity shop. I actually now really like it. I can read in bed because it has back-lighting. I normally have about three books on the go at one time.

1. 'Storm Proof' by John Hagee. A great devotional. Very positive.
2. 'The Rare Jewel of Christian Contentment' by Jeremiah Burroughs. Rather obscure, written in 1648, but it's fascinating to know that people in 1648 were experiencing the same problems, and seeking the same solutions, that people are in 2020. Actually it's a bit depressing to know that people are still seeking the same answers to the same problems.
3. 'Wuthering Heights' by Emily Bronte. I first read this at 11 years old, and now drag it out every winter, when it's cold and dark, and still love it. If anyone ever gets the chance to go to the North Yorkshire moors, do it. I went up their a few years ago, for the second time, and you really get a feel for the author and where she lived and the book itself.
 
Dec 19, 2014
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oh thats cool but I don't think I ever got into kindle. A friend let me borrow once but I much prefer real books.
I have an ipad but it doesn't have many ipad books on it. I only read e-books if I can't find a paper copy. Good for school text books though, although you can't colour in or write on kindles.

But I suppose we got to be thankful for kindle readers because they then donate all their books to charity shops where I go to pick them up lol.
 

bobinfaith

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For years I always confused Little Women with Wuthering Heights. I saw Wuthering Heights at the movies when I was 14 but didn't understand it.

I have a better understanding of these two stories, are excellent and would recommend anyone to read it. Of course the movie versions or (theatre play) are good but feel the books give a better story telling.

I was dusting my book cases this morning and thought about this thread. I'm going to gather most of my hard copies and store them in "good containers" to preserve them from mold or whatever. I thought about the seminary library but they have so much overstock from other donors and cannot get rid of them all. The rest of my books will remain on one bookcase next to my desk for continued referencing when doing my church work.

God bless us all and our families.
 
Dec 19, 2014
5,901
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New Zealand
www.literatelibrarian.com
For years I always confused Little Women with Wuthering Heights. I saw Wuthering Heights at the movies when I was 14 but didn't understand it.

I have a better understanding of these two stories, are excellent and would recommend anyone to read it. Of course the movie versions or (theatre play) are good but feel the books give a better story telling.

I was dusting my book cases this morning and thought about this thread. I'm going to gather most of my hard copies and store them in "good containers" to preserve them from mold or whatever. I thought about the seminary library but they have so much overstock from other donors and cannot get rid of them all. The rest of my books will remain on one bookcase next to my desk for continued referencing when doing my church work.

God bless us all and our families.
What are some of the titles you have in your boxes Bobinfaith?
Just curious.
 

bobinfaith

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What are some of the titles you have in your boxes Bobinfaith?
Just curious.
Hi Lanolin;

I don't have any more novels such as Wuthering Heights, Little Women, The Hardy Boys Mystery Books (if you consider the Hardy Boys as a novel,) They ended up elsewhere in the house, if this is what you were asking. I also have Moby Dick but, alas, have not begun reading it yet.
 
Dec 19, 2014
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www.literatelibrarian.com
I'm now working part time at a bookshop, and bonus, sometimes I get remainders.
My boss let me have DK illustrated Family Bible. It's great, it's hardback but the cover is on upside down!

I'm wondering if I'm allowed to put an upside down Bible in the library...I just need to make a dust jacket I suppose. Could be a challenge for my students...
 

Pastor Gary

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Lanolin - Have you ever made book dust covers out of the large brown paper shopping bags and clear packing tape? They work well and last a long time. You can decorate the face cover with colored markers and make them look very nice.